Topic: gravity

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Marble Tsunami marble run machine: 11,000 marbles

It's a Marble Tsunami! This huge marble run machine or knikkerbaan has more than 11,000 marbles rolling, sliding, zigzagging, hitting bells, and clacking endlessly into each other, making quite a cacophony. With four ...

Stanford’s MicroTug robot can pull 2,000x its weight on glass

Inspired by the incredible sticking power in ant feet and gecko toes, researchers at Stanford's Biomimetics and Dextrous Manipulation Lab have developed directional adhesives that help this 12-gram µTug (MicroTug) rob...

“Analog experiments” that appear to defy gravity

If we could control gravity, or if we could defy it, this is what it might look like: pouring water upside down, balloons flying away sideways, and paint dripping in all directions! This is Gravity, a series of "analo...

The One Year Mission in Space: Kelly & Kornienko arrive on ISS

On March 27, 2015, American astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko took off for the International Space Station in the Soyuz spacecraft for a historic One Year Mission, twice the length of an av...

Shylights: Blooming silk light sculptures at the Rijksmuseum

Made with silk, aluminum, polished stainless steel, LED's, and iPhone/iPad-controlled robotics, Shylights by Studio Drift mimic the natural world with their graceful metamorphosis. Watch as they fall 30 feet (9 meters...

Cambridge Ideas: The Sticky Feet of Ants & Cockroaches

Have you ever watched an ant walk up a wall? Have you seen one upside down on a ledge while carrying something? How do insect feet stick like that?! Get a very close look at the minuscule foot anatomy of ants and cock...

The Hammer-Feather Drop in the world’s biggest vacuum chamber

...though in this case, "the hammer" is a bowling ball. In this excellent clip from the BBC's Human Universe: Episode 4, Professor Brian Cox visits NASA’s Space Power Facility in Ohio, home of the world's biggest vacu...

Watch this 3,500 ton combat ship get launched sideways

How do you get a 3,500 ton littoral combat ship from the shipyard into the water without a set of well-coordinated supercranes or help from a friendly giant? Does sliding it sideways into a river as if it was Scuffy t...

To the Scientists of the Future: Materials science with EUPHRATES

Created by EUPHRATES and Masahiko Sato for Japan's National Institute for Material Science (NIMS), these three "To the Scientists of the Future" short films are a mesmerizing combination of materials research innovati...

Waltzing on the walls of Oakland’s City Hall

This incredible aerial performance by Bandaloop Founder and Artistic Director Amelia Rudolph and company dancer Roel Seeber showcases some perspective-shifting choreography on Oakland, California's 18-story City Hall....

Power of Optics: A light-powered Rube Goldberg machine

In this commercial for au Hikari, one of Japan’s high-speed optical internet service providers, a Rube Goldberg machine is "powered" by a single beam of light that travels via mirrors, magnifying glasses, and reflecti...

Solar System, Milky Way, Laniakea: Our home supercluster

Our home planet, Earth, circles the sun. The sun, our star, is but one of billions of stars in the Milky Way, our home galaxy... and beyond that? Where on the map of the cosmos is the Milky Way? For the first time, we...

The Iron Genie Harmonograph

Watch artist Anita Chowdry's Iron Genie Harmonograph create intricate, spirograph-like drawings. Made of steel, it was inspired by mid-19th century harmonographs and St. Pancras Station's Victorian engineering. The vi...

Street performer Isaac Hou rides a Cyr wheel

Isaac Hou spins and swirls, gracefully riding a Cyr wheel in the streets and abandoned buildings of Taiwan. Well known as a local street performer, juggler, and circus-style acrobat, fan videos of his performances hav...

OK Go: The Writing’s on the Wall

A four-minute, epic one-take video that adds to their highly ambitious visual collection of music, this is OK Go's The Writing's on the Wall. The series of forced perspective and anamorphic illusions, with a few gravi...

The Neutral Buoyancy Lab

If you have underwater training or testing to conduct, NASA has the Neutral Buoyancy Lab for you! Cranes! Diving suits! Workshops! Hyperbaric chambers! This video is a strange and fabulous mix ...

Why is ketchup so hard to pour?

That moment that ketchup transitions from a solid, high up in the ketchup bottle, to a liquid that squirts all over your fries – that moment is a big physics moment. Why? Ketchup is a non-Ne...

Grand Illusions: Tippe Top

Discovered by German physicist Helen Sperl in 1891, popularized in 1950 by Danish engineer Werner Ostberg, and demonstrated here by Grand Illusions' Hendrik Ball, this is a Tippe Top. Watch as i...

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