growing

Showing 30 posts tagged growing

Maple trees + good timing + basic chemistry = maple syrup. But Science Friday takes us behind the scenes of maple syrup research to show that there’s much more to it than that. While the tradition has been to tap fully grown wild trees – commercially with lots of plastic tubing – recent experiments at University of Vermont’s Proctor Maple Research Center have found that harvesting from the cut tops of juvenile trees might yield 5 to 6 times per acre, surprisingly without harming the young trees.

Lots of questions about this one: What are the other differences between the farm vs forest model of growing trees? Does this new process affect the local birds or creatures underground? What do these young trees look like in 20 years? What questions do you have?

File under: food, trees, and how things are made.

From Science Friday.

From KQED Science, find out how San Francisco’s 600 tons of compostable waste can be transformed into a dark, nutrient-rich material that will not only feed plants to improve the quality of what we eat and drink, but that also has the potential to offset America’s carbon emissions by over 20%. Above, agronomist Bob Shaffer takes us Inside the Compost Cycle.

Food scraps, mostly compostable, are over 30% of everyone’s garbage, and could instead help turn poor dirt into nutrient-rich soil where you live. If you’re interested in learning how to compost, check out these excellent links:

Watch more videos about sustainability, including the Moser Lamp, shaggy lawnmowers, Pierre’s high school greenhouse, Brooklyn’s Eagle Street Rooftop Farm, and how to use a paper towel.

What does it take to make a t-shirt? We’ve watched a video about this subject before, but NPR’s Planet Money answered this question in the most amazing way: they traveled across the globe to document the people and processes of this task firsthand. The stories are in five chapters. Above, Chapter 1: Cotton, and below, Chapter 2: Machines

A note for younger viewers: In Chapter 3: People, which features the story of Jasmine Akhter, a garment worker in Bangladesh, there are graphic scenes of the Rana Plaza factory building collapse from 3m10s to 3m52s.

You can watch the entire piece on their information-filled site: Planet Money Makes a T-Shirt.

In the archives: more videos about money and clothing.

via @faketv.

From Edutopia, this is the story of a high school student who brought his hobby — growing food with an aquaponic system for his family and neighbors — to his school’s underutilized greenhouse, creating a local edible schoolyard for his fellow students and his community. And he’s not stopping there: 

"I want to bring this system into many different schools. You know, learning opportunity that a system like this provides is immense. You’ve got water chemistry, agriculture, science, physics, mathematics, economics. A lot of these subjects could be modeled from this particular system. If I can provide a curriculum to go with this system then the knowledge of aquaponics will be proliferated throughout, hopefully, the United States."

Read more about this project, the Edible Schoolyard project, and aquaponics. Related: the differences between aquaponics and hydroponics.

Watch more videos about farming, including two Swaziland teens who developed an affordable hydroponics system and the Paignton Zoo’s inhouse vertical farm.

And if you’re interested in supporting students in alternative farming, check out these projects on Donor’s Choose.