Topic: history

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How traditional Nabulsi soap is handmade in the Toukan Soap factory

In the city of Nablus in the West Bank, workers at the Toukan Soap factory make natural soap by hand. The family-owned company is "the oldest survivor of this once-prominent industry," one of the two remaining soap fa...

The rise and fall of the Inca empire

It was the western hemisphere's largest empire ever, with a population of nearly 10 million subjects. Yet within 100 years of its rise in the fifteenth century, the Inca Empire would be no more. What happened? With...

Untangling the Devil’s Corkscrew – PBS Eons

In the late 1800s, paleontologists in Nebraska found huge coils of hardened sand stuck deep in the earth. Local ranchers called them Devil's Corkscrews and scientists called them Daemonelix. It was clear these corkscr...

Ceramic artist Michelle Erickson recreates an 18th-century agateware teapot

Recreating an 18th century artifact is a painstaking process that requires mastery of the medium, an understanding of esoteric artisanal methods, and lots of examination and experimentation. During her 2012 artist res...

Making Artificial Earthquakes with a Four-Tonne Steel Ball

In Göttingen, Germany, there's a four-tonne steel ball that can be raised up a 14-metre tower -- and then dropped in less than two seconds, crashing back to earth. It makes tiny, artificial earthquakes. Tom Scott v...

A New Republic: The portrait work of artist Kehinde Wiley

Blending and contrasting contemporary clothes and objects with ornate fabrics, lush plant life, detailed patterns, and bold colors that reference earlier eras of art history, Kehinde Wiley's heroic portraits are large...

Food of the Enslaved: Michael Twitty cooks recipes from American history

Historic interpreter and culinary historian Michael W. Twitty preserves and promotes the food traditions of enslaved African and African American communities in the 18th and 19th centuries. From the dishes he makes to...

Golden Kingdoms: Luxury & Legacy in the Ancient Americas

Emblems of royalty, sacred offerings, ornaments, adornments, and treasures endowed with symbolic significance. Follow the development of goldworking from the Inca Empire, the Aztec Empire, and other ancient civilizati...

The Art of Gem Carving

A brownish-red mineral, a gemstone called carnelian, is cut and carved with modern tools in this 2009 video for a Carvers and Collectors: The Lasting Allure of Ancient Gems exhibition at the Getty Museum: The Art of G...

How pencils are made at the Derwent Pencil Factory

Travel to Cumbria in the United Kingdom where workers at the Derwent Pencil Factory, established in 1832, work together to create graphic pencils, color pencils, watercolor pencils, and other artists' products. This w...

The Link Between Japanese Samurai and Real Indigo

Real indigo-dyed clothing is not like the blue you know. Richer than the chemical blues used on most fabrics today, real indigo dye comes from a plant and has a surprising range of qualities: on fabric it is antibacte...

Getting dressed in 18th century England

What kind of garments did women wear in 18th century England? The above video from CrowsEye Productions, filmed for the Lady Lever Art Gallery just outside of Liverpool, shows the daily dressing routine of a working w...

Carl Linnaeus’ Systema Naturae and Herbarium Cabinet

How did scientists and naturalists organize their artifact collections in the 1700s? How could these systems, long before we began to rely on computers to help us organize data, improve our understanding of the natura...

How Yodoe oil-paper umbrellas are crafted in Japan

There's a long tradition of making oil-paper umbrellas in Yodoe, a city in the Tottori Prefecture of Japan. The process involves over 70 steps, crafted on a variety of specially-made tools by skilled artisans, includi...

How to Make a Navigational Chart

Called Mattangs, Medos, and Rebbelibs, these ancient stick charts were made from the midribs of coconut fronds by the master navigators of what's now known as the Marshall Islands in Micronesia. The intersections of s...

Pecan – How Does it Grow?

How do pecans grow? And how do you say the word pecan? This True Food TV video answers both questions during a visit to the Georgia's Hudson Pecan Company. Georgia is number one producer of pecans on the planet despit...

Henry Fox Talbot, the First Photographs, and the Pioneers of Photography

The invention of the photograph, in 1839, would forever change the way people looked at the world. But this extraordinary breakthrough cannot be credited to a single individual—while William Henry Fox Talbot labored q...

Weaving on Mount Vernon’s 18th Century Loom

See how shirt fabric was woven on a four-poster wooden loom or barn loom in this demonstration at Mount Vernon, President George Washington's plantation home on the Potomac River in Virginia. Master weaver Melissa Wea...

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