Topic: history

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How many ways are there to prove the Pythagorean theorem?

What do Euclid, 12-year-old Einstein, and American President James Garfield have in common? They all came up with elegant proofs for the famous Pythagorean theorem, one of the most fundamental rules of geometry and th...

Postcards from Saturn: The incredible images that Cassini sent home

For over a decade, Cassini has orbited around Saturn 294 times, collected more than 600 GB of data, visited over a dozen moons and discovered at least seven new ones. It has sent over 400,000 images back home. Skun...

Marta Minujín’s ‘Parthenon’ of Banned Books in Kassel

In Kassel, Germany, at the very site where Nazis once burned over 2,000 books by Jewish and Marxist writers, one artist has built a colossal tribute to free speech. The “Parthenon of Books” is a giant temporary replic...

Where do new words come from? – TED Ed

There are over 170,000 words currently in use in the English language. Yet every year, about a thousand new words are added to the Oxford English Dictionary. Where do they come from, and how do they make it into our e...

How balloons are made – The Magic of Making

How are balloons made? In this video from The Magic of Making, a series of short films for kids created in partnership with with BBC Worldwide, we begin with a history lesson about Kew Gardens and stolen rubber trees ...

Voyager at 40: Humanity’s ambitious expedition into interstellar space

On August 20, 1977, NASA launched the Voyager 2 space probe, following it with Voyager 1's launch on September 5th, 1977. Together, the two spacecrafts are one of humanity's most ambitious expeditions into space. Taki...

Why America still uses Fahrenheit

Since I've moved to the US in 2010, there's one thing that I still don't fully understand: the imperial system. Virtually every country on earth uses Celsius but America has yet to follow. Although it might not seem l...

Why is syrup sticky?

Water isn't sticky, and sugar on its own isn't sticky either. So why is syrup—a heated, melty combination of water and sugar—so very, very sticky? Emily Elert of MinuteEarth explains the sticky molecular structures of...

The rise and fall of the Berlin Wall

On August 13, 1961, construction workers began tearing up streets and erecting barriers in Berlin. This night marked the beginning of one of history’s most infamous dividing lines: the Berlin Wall. Construction contin...

Humphry Davy’s Potassium Volcano

Humphry Davy is one of the best know men of science of the nineteenth century. He isolated nine different chemical elements, was the first person to inhale nitrous oxide and invented the miner's safety lamp known as t...

Casdoce (カスドース), a confection made for lords & emperors

Traditional castella sponge cakes, introduced to Japan by Portuguese merchants circa 1550, are cut precisely into bite-sized pieces before they're soaked in bright yellow egg yolks and boiled in a sugar water syrup. T...

How Does It Grow? Blueberries

Wild blueberries are native to the Americas, from forests in the Andes Mountains northward to the Arctic tundra. They were an important part of the food, culture, and medicinal practices of North America's indigenous ...

The Squid and the Whale: Evidence for an Epic Encounter

One of the most famous dioramas in the American Museum of Natural History depicts a battle between two gigantic animals: the sperm whale and giant squid. But unlike most dioramas in the Museum’s halls, this scene has ...

Sara Berman’s Closet

"And here we are, in the midst of elaborate trappings, of elaborate lives: An illumination of how important a modest life can be. This closet, all lined up with military precision and loving care, represents the unend...

Eighty Years of New York City, Then and Now

From The New Yorker, enjoy this split-screen juxtaposition of New York City in the 1930s and today. Cross the Brooklyn Bridge, tour Central Park, see huge differences in midtown and Times Square, get a glimpse at Harl...

The ferocious predatory dinosaurs of Cretaceous Sahara

In Cretaceous times (around 100 million years ago), North Africa was home to a huge river system and a bizarre menagerie of giant prehistoric predators -- including the Spinosaurus, a dinosaur even more fearsome than ...

Colorscope, an exploration of color across cultures

How do different cultures perceive and use color? Colorscope touches upon those perceptions and uses throughout history in this series of videos from CNN Creative, written and narrated by British art historian and bro...

Territorial History of the USA: Every Month for 400 Years

Starting in 1629 and continuing through every month for (almost) 400 years, see how the contiguous United States formed colony by colony, then state by state, expanding with massive territories and redefining within c...

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