Topic: history

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The 1995 Hubble photo that changed astronomy

If you hold a pin at arm’s length up in the air, the head of the pin covers approximately the amount of sky that appears in the Hubble Deep Field. The iconic 1995 image is crowded, not because it’s a broad swath of sk...

The Loneliest Tree in the World

In 1895, John Medley Wood discovered a cluster of peculiar Encephalartos Woodii on the fringe of the oNgoye Forest in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. A basal offset of the male dioecious tree was sent to Kew Gardens in L...

Installing massive statues with engineering and care at the Met

How do you move and install a three ton statue circa 170 BC? How do you move and install a ten ton statue? In these behind-the-scenes time lapse video from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, we get to se...

Slingshots of the Oceanic

There are many ways of moving through the Universe – of traveling from one point to another over great, even extraordinary distances. There is also a way of using the world for your own ends: taking advantage of slope...

Kids Try 100 Years of Sandwiches from 1900 to 2000

If you've been unhappy with the food in your school lunchbox or are looking for a few new ideas, find some inspiration in this unusual but super delicious history lesson from Bon Appétit: Kids Try 100 Years of Sandwic...

Why the metric system matters

The United States is one of three countries in the world that has not adopted the metric system, and that may fall to two if Burma embraces metrication. How did inches, feet, pounds, gallons, and other familiar United...

Explaining The Tree of Life

Travel millions of years through time with Sir David Attenborough as he explains The Tree of Life. Some background on the metaphor from The New York Times: In his 1859 book “On the Origin of Species,” Charles Darw...

The Dipped Painting Project by Oliver Jeffers

From children's book author and illustrator Oliver Jeffers, a project that explores memory and loss in a mix of art and experience: The Dipped Painting Project. In November of 2014 I began the first of a series of ...

Inside the Svalbard Seed Vault – Veritasium

In the northernmost town on Earth, on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen, the Svalbard Global Seed Vault protects around 865,000 seed samples from almost every country on our planet (including North Korea). A gene ba...

Sir David Attenborough at 90, an interview

In celebration of his 90th birthday on the May 8th 2016, Sir David Attenborough reflects on his incredible career as a world renowned broadcaster and naturalist. Attenborough also comments on the advances in filmm...

The Man Who Put the Pee in Phosphorus

In the 1660's, German alchemist Hennig Brand thought he knew the secret to making solid gold: pee. So set was he on these golden ambitions, he dehydrated 1,500 gallons (gallons!) of human urine to make it happen. Thou...

How is Victorian Nectar Drop candy made?

...and why are lemon drops, cough drops, and fruit drops all called drops? In this video by Tallahassee, Florida's Lofty Pursuits artisanal candy makers, we get an up close look at how their restored candy equipme...

Dinosaur fossils uncovered on an Antarctic expedition

A team of 12 scientists recently completed an audacious fossil hunting expedition to James Ross Island in Antarctica, and returned with over one ton of marine, avian, and dinosaur fossils that are between 71 million a...

Petrified Forest National Park & how petrified wood is made

Fallen coniferous trees from 211-218 million years ago can be found scattered across the desert of eastern Arizona in the form of petrified wood. Made primarily from quartz, these geological wonders are actually fossi...

The Story of Zero – Getting Something from Nothing

Once upon a time, zero wasn’t really a number. Its journey to the fully fledged number we know and love today was a meandering one. Today, zero is both a placeholder, and tool, within our number system signifying an a...

A Vault of Color: Protecting the World’s Rarest Pigments

In Cambridge, Massachusetts, you can find dragon's blood, mummy, and a very rare ball of dried urine from cows that have been fed nothing but mango leaves (now considered a harmful process for the cows). These things ...

Space Rocks: Comets, asteroids, meteors, & meteorites

This claymation primer on comets, asteroids, meteoroids, meteors, and meteorites helps us learn about Space Rocks in a super adorable way. Made by Beakus for the Royal Observatory Greenwich, the animation is one in a ...

How To Make A Mini da Vinci Catapult

It's true that you can buy da Vinci Catapult kits online, but how cool would it be to build one from scratch? Andy Elliott shares how he made a mini da Vinci Catapult from a wooden folding ruler, screws, and some work...

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