Topic: history

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How Does It Grow? Blueberries

Wild blueberries are native to the Americas, from forests in the Andes Mountains northward to the Arctic tundra. They were an important part of the food, culture, and medicinal practices of North America's indigenous ...

The Squid and the Whale: Evidence for an Epic Encounter

One of the most famous dioramas in the American Museum of Natural History depicts a battle between two gigantic animals: the sperm whale and giant squid. But unlike most dioramas in the Museum’s halls, this scene has ...

Sara Berman’s Closet

"And here we are, in the midst of elaborate trappings, of elaborate lives: An illumination of how important a modest life can be. This closet, all lined up with military precision and loving care, represents the unend...

Eighty Years of New York City, Then and Now

From The New Yorker, enjoy this split-screen juxtaposition of New York City in the 1930s and today. Cross the Brooklyn Bridge, tour Central Park, see huge differences in midtown and Times Square, get a glimpse at Harl...

The ferocious predatory dinosaurs of Cretaceous Sahara

In Cretaceous times (around 100 million years ago), North Africa was home to a huge river system and a bizarre menagerie of giant prehistoric predators -- including the Spinosaurus, a dinosaur even more fearsome than ...

Colorscope, an exploration of color across cultures

How do different cultures perceive and use color? Colorscope touches upon those perceptions and uses throughout history in this series of videos from CNN Creative, written and narrated by British art historian and bro...

Territorial History of the USA: Every Month for 400 Years

Starting in 1629 and continuing through every month for (almost) 400 years, see how the contiguous United States formed colony by colony, then state by state, expanding with massive territories and redefining within c...

The evolution of the book

What makes a book a book? Is it just anything that stores and communicates information? Or does it have to do with paper, binding, font, ink, its weight in your hands, the smell of the pages? To answer these questions...

Dr. Sylvia Earle, world-renowned oceanographer and explorer

If there is unofficial royalty in the field of science, little doubt exists that 81-year-old oceanographer Dr. Sylvia Earle claims one of the highest ranks... Her stories sound like biology class fairy tales—she's liv...

1953: Preserving and operating a wimmenumermolen polder mill

In a 250 year old polder mill in Noord Holland, Eric Zwijnenberg pumps excess water out of the area to avoid flooding. The drainage mill was first rented by his parents as a summer vacation house in 1953... After ...

Water powered hammer (Monjolo) – Primitive Technology

For farmers, millers, engineers, and artisans who live near a river or stream, a monjolo or kara-usu—a water powered hammer—can slowly grind grains into flours or soft stones into powders without repetitive human effo...

How to fit 4 years of trash into a mason jar, a zero waste experiment

Recycling, carrying reusable bags and coffee cups, buying compostable or metal straws, investing in solar energy... these are just a few of the eco-focused habits that consumers have embraced in recent decades. How di...

Yuasa Town: The Birthplace of Soy Sauce

Yuasa, a small coastal town in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan, is a fishing port and the producer of one of Japan’s most well known mandarin oranges, the Arida mikan. But a stroll through the traditional streets, includin...

Why are sloths so slow?

Around 35 million years ago, Earth was populated with giant, prehistoric ground sloths like Megalonyx jeffersonii (named after Thomas Jefferson), Paramylodon, and Megatherium who, until around 10,000 years ago, roamed...

Japanese manhole covers, a factory tour – ONLY in JAPAN

Whether they're in plain metal or decorated in bright colors, city manhole covers stand out in Japan's bustling streets. Personalized with bold yet intricate illustrations that highlight local sights, symbols, and sto...

The Archaeology of Crossrail and the history of London

The construction of London’s newest railway, which will be known as the Elizabeth line when services begin in 2018, has given archaeologists a unique chance to explore some of the city’s most historically important si...

Relighting “Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque)” by Georges Seurat

French post-Impressionist painter Georges Seurat is well-known for his pointillism technique and for his depictions of life in the late 1800s. In observing his painting Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque), we see these...

Genevieve von Petzinger & the invention of graphics on cave walls

Northern Spain's Cueva de El Castillo and Cueva de La Pasiega both contain incredible specimens of Franco-Cantabrian cave art, paintings and engravings in Cantabria province and southwestern France. El Castillo cave i...

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