Topic: history

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Pecan – How Does it Grow?

How do pecans grow? And how do you say the word pecan? This True Food TV video answers both questions during a visit to the Georgia's Hudson Pecan Company. Georgia is number one producer of pecans on the planet despit...

Henry Fox Talbot, the First Photographs, and the Pioneers of Photography

The invention of the photograph, in 1839, would forever change the way people looked at the world. But this extraordinary breakthrough cannot be credited to a single individual—while William Henry Fox Talbot labored q...

Weaving on Mount Vernon’s 18th Century Loom

See how shirt fabric was woven on a four-poster wooden loom or barn loom in this demonstration at Mount Vernon, President George Washington's plantation home on the Potomac River in Virginia. Master weaver Melissa Wea...

The complicated history of surfing – TED Ed

Today, surfing is a multi-billion-dollar global industry, with tens of millions of enthusiasts worldwide. For some it’s a serious sport; for others, just a way to let loose. But despite its casual association with fun...

The Genius of Marie Curie

Dr. Marie Curie transformed science and society with her discoveries. Her scientific partnership with Pierre Curie and the story of their heroic efforts that led to the discovery of polonium and radium are legendary.....

The mighty mathematics of the lever

Archimedes once said “Give me a place to stand, and I shall move the Earth.” While the idea of a person moving such a huge mass on their own might sound impossible, chances are you’ve seen this idea in action at your ...

How did Polynesian wayfinders navigate the Pacific Ocean?

Imagine setting sail from Hawaii in a canoe. Your target is a small island thousands of kilometers away in the middle of the Pacific Ocean — a body of water that covers more than 160 million square kilometers. For tho...

Journey of a Letter: How a birthday card is sent and delivered in London

How does a letter find its way from where it's written to the mailbox on the corner, to the post office, and out to the person it's being sent to? London's new Postal Museum shares this journey through the Royal Mail ...

The Challenge of a Straight Line and ‘Making Art Concrete’ – Getty Museum

How might you paint a perfectly sharp and clean straight line without blobs of paint or an unsteady hand creating a visually uneven edge? In concert with the Getty Museum's exhibition “Making Art Concrete: Works f...

How many ways are there to prove the Pythagorean theorem?

What do Euclid, 12-year-old Einstein, and American President James Garfield have in common? They all came up with elegant proofs for the famous Pythagorean theorem, one of the most fundamental rules of geometry and th...

Postcards from Saturn: The incredible images that Cassini sent home

For over a decade, Cassini has orbited around Saturn 294 times, collected more than 600 GB of data, visited over a dozen moons and discovered at least seven new ones. It has sent over 400,000 images back home. Skun...

Marta Minujín’s ‘Parthenon’ of Banned Books in Kassel

In Kassel, Germany, at the very site where Nazis once burned over 2,000 books by Jewish and Marxist writers, one artist has built a colossal tribute to free speech. The “Parthenon of Books” is a giant temporary replic...

Where do new words come from? – TED Ed

There are over 170,000 words currently in use in the English language. Yet every year, about a thousand new words are added to the Oxford English Dictionary. Where do they come from, and how do they make it into our e...

How balloons are made – The Magic of Making

How are balloons made? In this video from The Magic of Making, a series of short films for kids created in partnership with with BBC Worldwide, we begin with a history lesson about Kew Gardens and stolen rubber trees ...

Voyager at 40: Humanity’s ambitious expedition into interstellar space

On August 20, 1977, NASA launched the Voyager 2 space probe, following it with Voyager 1's launch on September 5th, 1977. Together, the two spacecrafts are one of humanity's most ambitious expeditions into space. Taki...

Why America still uses Fahrenheit

Since I've moved to the US in 2010, there's one thing that I still don't fully understand: the imperial system. Virtually every country on earth uses Celsius but America has yet to follow. Although it might not seem l...

Why is syrup sticky?

Water isn't sticky, and sugar on its own isn't sticky either. So why is syrup—a heated, melty combination of water and sugar—so very, very sticky? Emily Elert of MinuteEarth explains the sticky molecular structures of...

The rise and fall of the Berlin Wall

On August 13, 1961, construction workers began tearing up streets and erecting barriers in Berlin. This night marked the beginning of one of history’s most infamous dividing lines: the Berlin Wall. Construction contin...

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