Tag: how things work

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The Curiosity Show: How does a music box work?

In this clip from Australia's The Curiosity Show, science educator and co-host Deane Hutton demonstrates the basics of sound, moving air particles, and forced vibrations with a plastic comb, hacksaw blades, the metal ...

How do rockets work?

How are controlled explosions made just right so that they'll generate the kind of thrust that sends a rocket up, up, up and beyond our atmosphere? Analytical Chemist Raychelle Burks, Ph.D., explains how solid and...

Male Blue Manakins wait in line to impress a female

Taking turns with other suitors, male Blue Manakins seem to wait in a relatively polite line before briefly but repeatedly trying to impress their potential mate. Almost blending into the trees with her green feath...

TED Ed: How playing an instrument benefits your brain

Your brain is a muscle. When you give it more challenging exercises, you're strengthening your brain's abilities to learn and grow. Now add some music to the mix: When you listen to music, multiple areas of your b...

ExpeRimental: Static Magic

Reveal your kids' Jedi powers using static electricity with this episode of ExpeRimental from The Royal Institution of Great Britain. Watch ordinary household objects move without being touched as neuroscientist Profe...

Summertime Science: Sunburn, Sweat, and Wrinkly Fingers

Why do we sweat? Why do our fingers wrinkle in water? Why do we get sunburns? Joe Hanson explains it all in this summer science episode of It's Okay to Be Smart. Bonus: find out what those SPF numbers mean on your sun...

Why aren’t we only using solar power?

Solar power is cleaner, more sustainable, and in many cases, less expensive than coal-fueled power plants, so why aren't we only using solar power? Beyond the business and infrastructural challenges, TED Ed outlines s...

Spectroscopy of Stars – Wonders of the Universe

Understand what the universe is made of by looking at the light of its stars. In this clip from Wonders of the Universe – Stardust, Professor Brian Cox demonstrates how chemical elements emit a unique set of colors wh...

Changing shifts at le Phare de Kéréon

How do lighthouse keepers switch shifts when the lighthouse isn't connected to the mainland? We've seen how the tumultuous sea can almost overtake lighthouses during a storm, but the sea can be challenging even in mor...

Time lapse at the Port of Long Beach: The Art of Stevedore

Trucks, trains, huge ships, cranes, machines, containers, and more cranes! Filmmaker Alex Hallajian recorded operations at the Port of Long Beach, the second-busiest container port in the United States, 24/7 for seven...

The Physics Behind a Curveball – The Magnus Effect

What makes a curveball curve? How do soccer players (or football players internationally) bend the ball in the air? Physics! It's specifically called The Magnus Effect, "the commonly observed effect in which a spinnin...

Vermicomposting: How worms can reduce our waste

One third of food made in the world each year ends up in the trash can. How can we stop the waste by putting that food to good use? From TED Ed, learn how worms can naturally convert our organic waste — green leaves, ...

Testing Fireworks

How do you know that the fireworks you've made are going to burst in the sky as expected? Test them! In this episode of I Didn't Know That, visit one of the UK's leading fireworks manufacturers as they test the compon...

Burj Khalifa: The tech behind the world’s tallest building

The tallest man-made structure in the world (in 2014) is Dubai's Burj Khalifa. It stands 2,716 feet tall, cost $1.5 billion, and could not exist without its (very expensive) advanced technologies. Above, CNN Money exp...

Understanding tether dynamics through kite flying

For Hilary Costello's ongoing Ph.D. research, she can be found inside at a computer, coding and writing equations, and outside flying kites in the wide open spaces of Cambridge University. Her goal: "design an aerodyn...

How a locomotive works: GE Masterclass with Baratunde Thurston

In this promotional video series from General Electric, GE Masterclass with Baratunde Thurston, we go behind the scenes of GE's Global Research Center to explore engineering marvels, like how a freight locomotive work...

It’s Okay to Be Smart – The Cycle: Carbon and Oxygen and You

From PBS Digital Studios and Joe Hanson of It's Okay to Be Smart, this is The Cycle: Carbon and Oxygen and You, a visualized explanation for what happens when we breathe. And here it is explained: via It's Oka...

Spiders Tune Their Webs Like A Guitar

Much more than just a net to catch prey, spider webs can transmit lots of information about what has been caught or what might be visiting. Oxford researchers have recently discovered that the strands of silk vibrate ...

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