Topic: how things work

Sort: Date | Title | Sort Ascending
View:

The One Year Mission in Space: Kelly & Kornienko arrive on ISS

On March 27, 2015, American astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko took off for the International Space Station in the Soyuz spacecraft for a historic One Year Mission, twice the length of an av...

Cal Academy: Trogloraptors & How Science Works

In 2010, some amateur cave explorers discovered a relatively large six-eyed, hook-legged, orangey-brown spider in a Southern Oregon cave. In 2012, the spider was named Trogloraptor marchingtoni or Trogloraptor (which ...

The science of solar eclipses: How do solar & lunar eclipses work?

How do solar & lunar eclipses work? And why don't we get eclipses every month? This Vox explainer is packed full of really interesting information about the remarkable science of solar eclipses. Find out how 5.1 d...

Fig. 1: How Much Sugar Are You Really Eating?

The average American eats 19.5 teaspoons (82 grams) of sugar every day... that's around 66 pounds of sugar every year for each person. How are we consuming that amount? From Fig. 1 by University of California, learn m...

ScienceTake: The Praying Mantis Leaps

In this ScienceTake from The New York Times, we watch a young praying mantis leap over and over and over again... a completely fascinating, rather cartoon-like action that can be super-useful for scientists and engin...

Veritasium: How (and Why) Do Chameleons Change Color?

There is a misconception about chameleons... that they change their color in order to blend in with their environment. That is actually not the case... So why do chameleons change color and how are they doing it? ...

ExpeRimental: How to make fizzy bottle rockets

This ExpeRimental episode from The Royal Institution is full of super explosive fun. Danielle and Michael show a group of kids how to make fizzy bottle rockets with some small, sports-capped plastic bottles, some Alka...

The silent flight superpower of a stealthy predator: The Owl

It would be hard to escape a predator that has night vision, excellent hearing, and can swoop down upon prey in complete silence. In this clip from Owl Power, via Nature on PBS, an 11 year old barn owl named Kensa pro...

Crash Course Kids: Gotta Eat! and Feed Me: Classifying Organisms

Why do we eat and how does what we eat help classify what we are? In these first two episodes from Crash Course Kids, Sabrina explains why all living things eat. Also, try the simple energy source experiment in episod...

Classic Sesame Street: Broken Wrist

Breaking an arm, a leg, or some part of the body can be super scary. Not only does it hurt, but you may not know what's going to happen next. We love this classic Sesame Street video because it helps explain what to e...

Deep Look: Banana Slugs and Secret of the Slime

Slime can trigger an immediate ewwwww! reaction, but ooey gooey slime is actually a rather brilliant, problem solving substance. One of the animals that depends on its slime can be found among the gigantic redwood for...

NASA: Satellite Tracks Saharan Dust to Amazon in 3-D

Watch 182 million tons of dust ride the wind out of Africa's Sahara Desert in 3D, as tracked from 2007 through 2013 by lidar, thanks to CALIPSO, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation sa...

ExpeRimental: Candle Chemistry

In this episode of ExpeRimental, Lisa and Josh explain the unseen as they make a flame jump through the air. Josh also measures how long it takes for covered candles to extinguish on their own. There's more activity i...

Physics Girl: The Stacked Ball Drop (and Supernovas)

How is a supernova like a basketball, a bouncy ball, and a golf ball all stacked together? It's all in what happens when you drop them. In this video, Physics Girl Dianna Cowern demonstrates the momentum transfer betw...

Why do carrots taste sweeter in the winter?

From the University of California’s Fig.1 series, Molecular Biologist Liz Roth-Johnson explains why cold weather makes carrots taste more sweet: Because plants are immobile, they must develop defense techniques aga...

Fundamentals of Neuroscience Presents: Small Circuits

Small Circuits! This is one of the many wonderfully-presented lessons from Harvard's Fundamentals of Neuroscience free and open online course (or MOOC). While the video's terminology can be technical at times, the sim...

What makes that fresh rain smell? MIT films rain drops to find out

Why do we smell that fresh earthy scent before and/or after it rains? With high-speed cameras, MIT researchers have filmed rain drops, and believe that the footage explains petrichor, the "pleasant smell that frequent...

The Ring of Truth: Two Hydrogen Atoms & One Oxygen Atom

Possibly the most well-known scientific formula on the planet, H2O is one of those terms that we see around all the time. We know that H2O means water, and that a water molecule is composed of two hydrogen (H) atoms &...

« Prev