jellyfish

Showing 11 posts tagged jellyfish

Swim in a reef off the coast of Thailand’s Ko Phi Phi Ley where critically endangered Hawksbill turtles have a stronger population than in most places. Earth Touch cameraman Stewart Whitfield narrates his underwater adventure, observing glass fish, a flatworm, java rabbitfish, long-fin bannerfish, and this Hawksbill turtle as it snacks on a jellyfish.

In the archives: videos of more turtles and more jellies.

This Blue Button Jellyfish, or porpita porpita, is not actually a jellyfish. It’s a hydroid made up of individual zooids that float together at the water’s surface and each function differently: some eat, some reproduce, some defend, etc. From Coastal and Coral Culture:

Porpita porpita are hermaphrodites and have two main body structures.  The first part is the float which is a round disc like shape and is a golden-brown color. It is typically 1.5 inches wide or less, and has a single mouth underneath the float which is used for both the intake of nutrients and the dispersal of wastes. The second part is the hydroid colony (jellyfish like tentacles) that are bright blue, turquoise or yellow. Each strand is covered in branchlets and end in knobs of stinging calls called nematocysts.

Porpita porpita stings usually do not hurt but can cause skin irritation. They have gaseous bodies which allow them to float on the surface and are propelled by wind and ocean currents.

There are actual jellyfish and other types of marine life in the archives. 

From KQED Quest, the challenges and new research being explored by marine biologists that breed, collect and care for jellyfish and siphonophores at the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California.

Learn more about the diverse family tree of jelly-like creatures in this beautiful HD video from the Aquarium’s Research Institute, or watch more about marine biology.

A preview from The Deep Sea, ep11 of the BBC’s Nature’s Microworlds

Steve Backshall takes us to a place few have ever visited - the deep sea. 99 per cent of the space on Earth inhabited by life is under the ocean and almost 90 per cent of this is deeper than a kilometre, a place of perpetual darkness and crushing pressure. Far from being lifeless, the vast inner space of our planet contains an extraordinary array of beautiful and bizarre creatures, from 40m-long jellyfish to grotesque angler fish and vampire squid. Our journey from the sunlit surface waters to the deepest reaches of the abyss reveals how life persists in such a hostile world.