macro

Showing 13 posts tagged macro

Spend a quiet two minutes watching a woodlouse (aka pill bug, roly poly, cheeselog, armadillo bug, boat builder, slater, sow bug, roll up bug…) flip over from its back. Known for curling up into a protective ball, this “bug” has a lot of regional nicknames, but is it actually a bug? From a-z-animals: 

The woodlouse is not an insect but a crustacean that has 14 parts to its body, which gives the woodlouse the flexibility to be able to curl into a ball to protect itself from danger. This means that only the hard outer shell of the woodlouse is exposed.

The woodlouse is found in dark, damp places in forests and jungles throughout the world. The woodlouse feeds on decaying leaf and plant matter on the forest floor, meaning that the woodlouse plays a vital role in the natural carbon dioxide cycle.

The woodlouse is generally about 1 cm long but many species in the tropics are triple that size, some are even bigger. The woodlouse has an average lifespan of around 2 years but some are known to get up to 4 years old.

Related watching: crabs!

The timelapsed formation of snowflakes in macrofocus by Vyacheslav Ivanov. Music: Aphex Twin - Avril 14th.

Update via Colossal: “Ivanov confirms from his home in St. Petersburg that the video is indeed genuine (non digital) and was filmed through a microscope with a ‘lot of effort and patience.’”

Read more about the science behind the snowflake’s formation at io9.

Related watching: Snow Facts Cheat Sheetice crystals form on a soap bubblejazz and tiny hailstones, and instant ice crystals.

via Kuriositas.

What’s happening when a match is lit? From Answers.com

Matches contain sulfur, glass powder, and an oxidizing agent as the components in the match head. When you strike a match, the friction due to the particles of glass powder rubbing together generates enough heat to convert some of the red phosphorous to white phosphorous, which burns in the presence of oxygen gas. The heat from the friction also causes the oxidizing agent to produce oxygen gas, igniting the small amount of white phosphorous. Once ignited, the oxygen gas fuels the flame while the rest of the sulfur catches on fire. Of course, this entire process happens in a fraction of a second.

…unless, of course, someone films it at 4000 frames per second, and then you really get to spend time with all of the macro, slow-motion details. Fascinating to watch, and a great conversation starter about fire prevention and safety tips, and using matches as tools.

Related watching: Why do hot things glow?, firefighter helmet cam, and Smokey and The Little Boy.

Thanks, @_thp.

Turn your smartphone into a digital microscope for around $10: 

This DIY conversion stand is more than capable of functioning in an actual laboratory setting. With magnification levels as high as 175x, plant cells and their nuclei are easily observed! In addition to allowing the observation of cells, this setup also produces stunning macro photography.

We’re putting this on our must-build list. Related watching: more macro-view videos or Build Your Own Lego Microscope.

Thanks, @dontcallmedarth.