Topic: math

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The Dot & the Line: A Romance in Lower Mathematics (1965)

Winner of the Academy Award for Animated Short Film in 1965, and adapted from the celebrated book by Norton Juster, best-known for Phantom Tollbooth, this is The Dot and the Line: A Romance in Lower Mathematics. Th...

Kokichi Sugihara’s Impossible Rooftop & Folding Ladder Illusions

File under impossible objects, this is the Impossible Rooftop Illusion or "Anti-Gravity Two Sided Roof" by Meiji University's Professor Kokichi Sugihara in 2013. Using computer software, Sugihara creates award-winning...

The Curiosity Show: Matchstick Triangle Puzzle

Get out some matchsticks or toothpicks and some Play-Doh! Deane Hutton, science educator and co-host of Australia’s The Curiosity Show, sets up two challenges that requires some hands-on creative thinking: 1. How ...

More Evidence Birds Can Count: Where’d that other mealworm go?

Researchers are eagerly tricking wild New Zealand robins, but it's FOR SCIENCE! Watch as this box with a sliding trick drawer helps Alexis Garland and Jason Low at Victoria University of Wellington observe the behavio...

How do we study the stars & how do we measure extreme distances?

How can we know so much about other galaxies? What are they made of? How big are they? How far away are they from Earth? "Want to know the secrets of the universe? Just follow the light." These two TED Eds fro...

Pangraph v4: Making Spirocakes (Spirograph Pancakes)

Nathan Shields has been working on making spirograph pancakes for over a month. From his workshop to his kitchen, he's done the math, designed templates, made gear teeth on a bandsaw, tried out different materials, an...

Solar Powered Classroom

When Aaron Sebens started talking about renewable energy with his fourth grade class, they kept coming back to their excitement about solar power and making it a more hands-on learning experience. How might they move ...

Eva Szasz’s Cosmic Zoom (1968)

From director Eva Szasz and the National Film Board of Canada, Cosmic Zoom (1968) is a wordless journey that attempts to demonstrate the scale of the universe. Beginning with a boy boating on the Ottawa River, we trav...

The Iron Genie Harmonograph

Watch artist Anita Chowdry's Iron Genie Harmonograph create intricate, spirograph-like drawings. Made of steel, it was inspired by mid-19th century harmonographs and St. Pancras Station's Victorian engineering. The vi...

Noodles & the principle of halving — The Ring of Truth: Atoms

Chef Kin Jing Mark demonstrates how to make super-thin noodles and helps introduce the principle of halving in this clip from the PBS miniseries The Ring of Truth: An Inquiry Into How We Know What We Know - Atoms (198...

Understanding tether dynamics through kite flying

For Hilary Costello's ongoing Ph.D. research, she can be found inside at a computer, coding and writing equations, and outside flying kites in the wide open spaces of Cambridge University. Her goal: "design an aerodyn...

Numberphile: The Scientific Way to Cut a Cake

This "scientifically correct way" to cut a cake will not work for birthday parties, where the cakes are often consumed too quickly by kids and adults alike, but it may be absolutely perfect for the "mathematical loner...

Why do honeybees love hexagons?

What is it about the six-sided hexagon that makes it such a perfect shape for storing honey? It's an efficient design! Just ask a bee, one of nature’s finest mathematicians, or watch this TED Ed by Zack Patterson and ...

The beautiful physics and math of sneezes

If you don't cover your mouth when you sneeze, that sneeze and the germs within it are explosively set free into the surrounding area. But where do the droplets travel and how far can they reach? No one had done much ...

How can a straight metal rod pass through a curved hole?

Imagine how you might pass a straight metal rod through a curved hole. How does that work if neither bends? Is it impossible? This demonstration at the Science Museum in Valencia, Spain shows that it's absolutely poss...

Andres Amador’s Earthscapes: Art that Goes Out with the Tide

In a mix of artistry, geometry, and technology, San Francisco-based Earthscape artist Andres Amador creates massive sketches in the beach sand – sometimes geometric, and sometimes more abstrac...

How Do We Know How Old the Sun Is?

How Do We Know How Old the Sun Is? The Royal Observatory, Greenwich, and animation studio Beakus join together to explain how Kepler and Newton’s laws help us figure out the weight of the ...

Greek Legacy: How the Ancient Greeks shaped modern mathematics

Travel back in time to Ancient Greece where revolutionary thinkers – from Thales, Pythagoras, Democritus and Aristotle to Euclid, Archimedes, and Hypatia of Alexandria – helped define the rule...

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