Topic: math

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A Fold Apart: Origamist Robert Lang’s Incredible Paper Creations

Twenty five years ago, physicist Robert Lang worked at NASA, where he researched lasers. He has also garnered 46 patents on optoelectronics and even wrote a Ph.D. thesis called "Semiconductor Lasers: New Geometries an...

Measuring the Berlin TV Tower with a ruler

Can you calculate how tall a building or monument is by using a ruler and the scale on a map? Mathematician Matt Parker attempts this ambitious math feat during his trip to the German capital. The structure he's aimin...

Calculating Pi (π) with Darts

Can you calculate Pi (π) by throwing darts at a square and circle target as randomly as possible? Physics Girl's Dianna Cowern and Veritasium's Derek Muller attempt the challenge, and when "randomly" doesn't happen, t...

The exceptional life of Benjamin Banneker

Born in 1731 on a farm in Baltimore, Maryland, Benjamin Banneker was an accomplished author, publisher, scientist, astronomer, mathematician, urban planner, activist, and farmer throughout his life. A free descendant ...

An origami-inspired model for reconfigurable materials

Metamaterials — materials whose function is determined by structure, not composition — have been designed to bend light and sound, transform from soft to stiff, and even dampen seismic waves from earthquakes. But each...

The mathematics of sidewalk illusions

Have you ever come across an oddly stretched image on the sidewalk, only to find that it looks remarkably realistic if you stand in exactly the right spot? These sidewalk illusions employ a technique called anamorphos...

Can you solve the counterfeit coin riddle?

You're currently locked in the dungeon by orders of the king, but as the realm’s greatest mathematician, you've been given a chance to free yourself: If you can identify a counterfeit coin, one fake coin in a group of...

How high can you count on your fingers?

How high can you count on your fingers? It seems like a question with an obvious answer. After all, most of us have ten fingers -- or to be more precise, eight fingers and two thumbs. This gives us a total of ten digi...

Strain Wave Gearing LEGO Great Ball Contraption (GBC) Module

Behold another excellent Great Ball Contraption (GBC) from LEGO enthusiast Akiyuki, this one with Strain Wave Gearing. Akiyuki explains: Strain wave gearing consists of three components: a wave generator, a flex s...

Can you solve the airplane riddle?

Professor Fukanō, the famous scientist, has embarked on a new challenge – piloting around the world in a plane of his own design. There’s just one problem: there's not enough fuel to complete the journey. Luckily, the...

How a mathematician dissects an astonishing coincidence

True story about an adventure that befell Anne Parrish one June day in Paris. She was wandering through the old book stalls along the Seine with her husband who had been there before. He sat down at a table on the qua...

Can you solve the river crossing riddle? – TED Ed

How do three lions and three wildebeests, fleeing from a wildfire, cross over to the left bank of a crocodile-infested river to escape the flames? There's a raft! But there are a few rules that must be followed in ord...

3D-printed Metamaterial Mechanisms

Researchers at the Hasso-Plattner-Institute in Potsdam, Germany are exploring how 3D cell patterns called metamaterials can take on not-seen-in-nature properties based on their shape, geometry, size, orientation, and ...

Why the metric system matters

The United States is one of three countries in the world that has not adopted the metric system, and that may fall to two if Burma embraces metrication. How did inches, feet, pounds, gallons, and other familiar United...

Ambiguous Cylinder Illusion by Kokichi Sugihara

Second place winner of the Best Illusion of the Year Contest 2016, this is the Ambiguous Cylinder Illusion by mathematics professor Kokichi Sugihara of Meiji University in Tokyo, Japan. The direct views of the obj...

The Remarkable Way We Eat Pizza – Numberphile

You may never look at a pizza or an orange in the same way again. Watch as astronomer, author, and teacher Cliff Stoll explains the Theorema Egregium or the Remarkable Theorem in this Numberphile vid. More via Aatish ...

The Story of Zero – Getting Something from Nothing

Once upon a time, zero wasn’t really a number. Its journey to the fully fledged number we know and love today was a meandering one. Today, zero is both a placeholder, and tool, within our number system signifying an a...

Can you solve the locker riddle? – TED Ed

File under factors, multiples, square numbers, prime numbers, and sequences: This classic mystery novel set up has a wonderful math puzzle twist: Your rich, eccentric uncle just passed away, and you and your 99 na...


 
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