Topic: measurement

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What’s the Loudest Possible Sound? – It’s Okay to Be Smart

"What is the loudest possible sound? What about the quietest thing we can hear? And what do decibels measure, anyway?" This video from Joe Hanson and It's Okay to Be Smart dives into the wide ranging and incredibly se...

Machining a cube in a cube in a cube from a single metal block

This three-layered cube – a cube in a cube in a cube – was made from a single block of metal. It was machined with precision on a metal lathe and a drill by YouTuber Инженер BrunS, an experienced hobbyist. The cubes c...

MinutePhysics: How Big Is The Sun?

Even though the sun and the moon look around the same size in the sky, the sun is 400 times bigger than our planet's moon and is 400 times farther away. Compare the sun's 150,000,000 km (93,205,679-ish miles) distance...

PoSSUM Program Trains Scientists for Space Research

For those who want to be an astronaut or work in space, and for those climate scientists who want a closer look at the mesosphere -- the understudied layer of Earth's atmosphere that's above the stratosphere and below...

The science of solar eclipses: How do solar & lunar eclipses work?

How do solar & lunar eclipses work? And why don't we get eclipses every month? This Vox explainer is packed full of really interesting information about the remarkable science of solar eclipses. Find out how 5.1 d...

How Many Stars Are There? – It’s Okay to Be Smart

How many stars can our eyes see on a dark night? How many stars can we see with something even more powerful than our eyes? How many stars exist?? And how are grains of sand a part of this?! Joe Hanson and PBS Digital...

Fig. 1: How Much Sugar Are You Really Eating?

The average American eats 19.5 teaspoons (82 grams) of sugar every day... that's around 66 pounds of sugar every year for each person. How are we consuming that amount? From Fig. 1 by University of California, learn m...

The silent flight superpower of a stealthy predator: The Owl

It would be hard to escape a predator that has night vision, excellent hearing, and can swoop down upon prey in complete silence. In this clip from Owl Power, via Nature on PBS, an 11 year old barn owl named Kensa pro...

A Briefer History of Time: How tech changes us in unexpected ways

Have you ever gone camping where you wake and sleep with the sun and moon? Have you played outside all morning, only coming in when you get hungry for lunch? What was life like before we could measure time? How have c...

ExpeRimental: Candle Chemistry

In this episode of ExpeRimental, Lisa and Josh explain the unseen as they make a flame jump through the air. Josh also measures how long it takes for covered candles to extinguish on their own. There's more activity i...

Train tracks: How to replace railway ties without pulling up the rails

Railroad tracks are made of three main parts: the long steel rails that the trains run on, wooden or concrete railroad ties (US) or sleepers (UK), and the track ballast that helps bear a train's weight and keeps the t...

How Small Is An Atom?

Using a strand of hair, your fist, rice and sand grains, as well as the room you're sitting in right now (assuming it's not a huge gymnasium), let's try to visualize the basic building block of everything around us: A...

3D-Printed “Blooming” Fibonacci Zoetrope Sculptures

Animation is a trick of the eye, and we're often reminded of this when we get to see animation happen right in front of us. 3D-printed zoetrope sculptures by math and Fibonacci-inspired artist and designer John Edmark...

CYMATICS: Science + music = audio frequency visualizations

With help from a Chladni Plate, vibrating liquid on a speaker dish, a hose pipe optical trick, ferrofluid, a Ruben's Tube, and a Telsa Coil, New Zealand musician Nigel Stanford showcases audio frequency visualizations...

How do we study the stars & measure extreme distances in space?

How can we know so much about other galaxies? What are they made of? How big are they? How far away are they from Earth? "Want to know the secrets of the universe? Just follow the light." These two TED Eds fro...

A pendulum wave demonstration with bowling balls

Thanks to these 16 bowling balls hung from a 20 foot wooden frame in the mountains of North Carolina, we can see what a large-scale pendulum wave apparatus looks (and sounds) like. Filmed by Maria Ikenberry, she also ...

Eva Szasz’s Cosmic Zoom (1968)

From director Eva Szasz and the National Film Board of Canada, Cosmic Zoom (1968) is a wordless journey that attempts to demonstrate the scale of the universe. Beginning with a boy boating on the Ottawa River, we trav...

Everything You Need to Know About Planet Earth

When we wake up, eat breakfast, get ready for school or work, and head out the door, we may not be thinking about how unique our small, wet rock of a planet is. But the Earth is unique, and we're always happy to happe...

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