Topic: microbiology

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Invisible Nature: The (Super Tiny) Glowing Squid

The Hawaiian bobtail squid (Euprymna scolopes) spends its days buried in sand and its nights stalking prey in the shallow waters off the coast of Hawaii. Just because the squid hunts at night, however, doesn’t mean th...

How the food you eat affects your gut – TED Ed

The bacteria in our guts can break down food the body can’t digest, produce important nutrients, regulate the immune system, and protect against harmful germs. And while we can’t control all the factors that go into m...

Seashell inspiration: Growing cement bricks with bacteria

Imagine an 8-year-old girl studying a seashell on the sand in Gulf Shores, Alabama in 1985. It's her first trip to the beach and it's a moment that will set the course of her career: “The 8-year-old version of mys...

Evolutionary branching in action: Bacteria adapt to antibiotics

Watch E. coli bacteria encounter increasing strengths of antibiotics, the medicine that we use to fight infections or infectious diseases. A team led by Harvard Medical School's Michael Baym set up the video demonstra...

Hunting for microbes in Central Park’s murkiest waters

Follow biologist Sally Warring into New York City's Central Park as she collects water samples from fountains and ponds to find instagrammable microbes. From her site PondLife.com: All free-living life forms are m...

Explaining The Tree of Life

Travel millions of years through time with Sir David Attenborough as he explains The Tree of Life. Some background on the metaphor from The New York Times: In his 1859 book “On the Origin of Species,” Charles Darw...

Why do some people have seasonal allergies?

If you've ever experienced watery eyes, sneezing, runny nose, itchy throat, and other allergic reactions during springtime, or you haven't but you know someone who has, this beautifully animated TED Ed by Eleanor Nels...

How Does Oakland Turn Food Scraps to Soil?

Though you may not see a compost bin next to the trash and recycling bins where you live, in California's Bay Area, a green bin is the norm. From those green bins, food scraps, yard waste, and the like can be transfor...

What do baby sloths sound like?

Clinging and climbing at Sloth Sanctuary of Costa Rica, these baby sloths demonstrate their adorable squeaks. Animalist visited the sanctuary for Sloth Week in June, 2014 to interview sanctuary founder Judy Avey-Arroy...

Subvisual Subway – The Art of New York City’s Bacterial World

Why do we wash our hands after we've been riding on public transportation? Is it true that "using the handrails on the subway is like shaking hands with 100 people"? New York City-based typographer and designer Craig ...

The Foldscope – A Paper Microscope that Costs $1

To help make microscopes as accessible and as sturdy as pencils, Stanford University biophysicist Manu Prakash created an ultra-low-cost origami-based microscope. He was inspired by a 2011 visit to a Thailand clinic w...

Wim van Egmond’s award-winning microscopic videos

Winning first place in Nikon's 2015 Small Worlds in Motion competition, this is a Trachelius ciliate feeding on a Campanella ciliate -- "a classic life and death struggle played out in miniature" -- captured by Wim va...

The Hidden Perils of Permafrost – Deep Look

When you put a permafrost core in a CT scanner and analyze the data, you're traveling back in time to answer important questions: What was buried deep within the frozen soil? How much of it is ice or plant matter? How...

Immunity and Vaccines Explained – NOVA PBS

Why do we get shots when visiting the doctor? How do vaccines work with our immune systems to keep us from getting sick? From NOVA PBS: Immunity and Vaccines Explained. Our bodies are bombarded by bacteria and ...

ScienceTake: How an Embryo Grows

From a single cell to a whole organism, how do animals grow into such diverse and complex creatures from their embryonic beginnings? What if we could follow and map a human's development from a single cell to the esti...

Vermicomposting: How worms can reduce our waste

One third of food made in the world each year ends up in the trash can. How can we stop the waste by putting that food to good use? From TED Ed, learn how worms can naturally convert our organic waste — green leaves, ...

Cell vs. virus: A battle for health

From TED Ed and Shannon Stiles, Cell vs. virus: A battle for health:  All living things are made of cells. In the human body, these highly efficient units are protected by layer upon layer of defense against i...

Inside the Compost Cycle: Turning waste to nutrient-rich soil

From KQED Science, find out how San Francisco’s 600 tons of compostable waste can be transformed into a dark, nutrient-rich material that will not only feed plants to improve the quality...

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