Topic: microscopic

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The seafloor microscope that can reveal corals’ secrets

See the seafloor like you've never seen it before, thanks to this microscope, the first to show 1.6 millimeter-sized coral polyps up close in the wild. An effort to better understand these lifeforms in the face of cor...

Stanford’s µTug microrobots can pull a car

Watch six of Stanford's µTug (MicroTug) robots pulling an unmodified 3,900lb (1,800kg) car thanks to special directional adhesive "shoes" and "a very long, very slow, but very steady winching gate." The six microTugs ...

See Microbes with this DIY Phone Microscope

What tiny creatures are living in the street puddles or pond water where you live? You can discover them for yourself using a smartphone, some poster tack, and a laser pointer. In this episode of Gross Science, Anna R...

The Foldscope – A Paper Microscope that Costs $1

To help make microscopes as accessible and as sturdy as pencils, Stanford University biophysicist Manu Prakash created an ultra-low-cost origami-based microscope. He was inspired by a 2011 visit to a Thailand clinic w...

Wim van Egmond’s award-winning microscopic videos

Winning first place in Nikon's 2015 Small Worlds in Motion competition, this is a Trachelius ciliate feeding on a Campanella ciliate -- "a classic life and death struggle played out in miniature" -- captured by Wim va...

You Have Mites Living On Your Face – Gross Science

Yep, you have mites living on your face. And in this episode of Gross Science, Anna Rothschild explains how they're eating, laying eggs, dying, and leaking feces. On your face. But don't worry because we've known this...

Stanford’s MicroTug robot can pull 2,000x its weight on glass

Inspired by the incredible sticking power in ant feet and gecko toes, researchers at Stanford's Biomimetics and Dextrous Manipulation Lab have developed directional adhesives that help this 12-gram µTug (MicroTug) rob...

How do you find water bears (tardigrades) in the wild?

Tardigrades (also called water bears or moss piglets) refer to over 1,150 species of microscopic aquatic animals that can be found in moss, ferns, lichens, soil, beaches, dunes, and other damp habitats all over the pl...

From Drifter to Dynamo: The Story of Plankton – Deep Look

Mind-blowing fact: A massive group of single-celled algae called diatoms are considered champions of photosynthesis. Why? Diatoms are responsible for an estimated 20% to 40% -- maybe even 60% -- of the Earth's oxygen....

Hydrophobic metal made with laser-etched microscopic patterns

Scientists from the University of Rochester have created water-repelling metal by laser-etching nanostructures into the surface. Watch as water droplets bounce like water balloons off of the metal's super-hydrophobic ...

The Fantastic Fur of Sea Otters – Deep Look

Sea otters are creatures who live in water that's far too cold for their bodies. There are other animals, like whales and sea lions, that are insulated from the cold by blubber, a layer of fat under their skin, but as...

The Sticky Feet of Ants & Cockroaches – Cambridge Ideas

Have you ever watched an ant walk up a wall? Have you seen one upside down on a ledge while carrying something? How do insect feet stick like that?! Get a very close look at the minuscule foot anatomy of ants and cock...

What Gives the Morpho Butterfly Its Magnificent Blue? – Deep Look

What does it mean to be blue? Let's look deep into something called structural coloration, the physics of light, and how it's possible that the Morpho butterfly's wings appear to be blue, despite their containing no b...

Animated Life: Seeing the Invisible

"Everything that you can actually see with your eye is just the smallest sliver of life on this Earth. Most of life is invisible..." And so begins the exquisite paper-puppetry of Seeing the Invisible, a video by F...

ScienceTake: How an Embryo Grows

From a single cell to a whole organism, how do animals grow into such diverse and complex creatures from their embryonic beginnings? What if we could follow and map a human's development from a single cell to the esti...

Skunk Bear’s Click to Enlarge – Popcorn

From NPR’s Skunk Bear, POP in and watch the science and history of popcorn, explained with the assistance of a microscope and a high speed camera. Click to Enlarge: Popcorn. Thanks, Heathe...

Plants and Insects Magnified Thousands of Times

German photographer Stefan Diller has made micro worlds into immense and detailed landscapes to fly over. After three years of work, he’s refined a mix of scanning electron microscope (...

Bacteria Growth, a time lapse

From medicalschool, watch this time lapse clip of how bacteria reproduce by dividing into two every 20 minutes.  Bacteria are microscopic single-cell organisms that are found in the air, ins...

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