Topic: molecules

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Go inside an ice cave to see nature’s most beautiful blue

Where do glaciers and icebergs get their beautiful blue color? This unique blue might be nature’s most brilliant, and the color arises in a very special way thanks to some surprising interactions between light and wat...

Surface tension and The Cheerios Effect

Ever notice how cereal clumps up in your bowl, or how cereal sticks to the edges of the bowl? Bubbles in beverages do the same thing. You've probably seen this surface tension and buoyancy at work, but did you know th...

Why is syrup sticky?

Water isn't sticky, and sugar on its own isn't sticky either. So why is syrup—a heated, melty combination of water and sugar—so very, very sticky? Emily Elert of MinuteEarth explains the sticky molecular structures of...

Demonstrations of the Coanda Effect

Fluids flowing near a surface tend to follow the shape of the surface. Using Schlieren optics, we can see this behavior. It is known as the Coanda Effect and its explanation depends on viscosity, the frictional forces...

Oxygen’s surprisingly complex journey through your body

Oxygen forms about 21% of the air around us. In your body, oxygen forms a vital role in the production of energy in most cells. But if gases can only efficiently diffuse across tiny distances, how does oxygen reach th...

The scientist that grows ‘identical twin snowflakes’

Snow crystals form when humid air is cooled to the point that molecules of water vapor start sticking to each other. In the clouds, crystals usually start forming around a tiny microscopic dust particle, but if the wa...

Can Bird Poop Make Clouds?

How does bird poop potentially help to keep our climate just a wee bit cooler? In this episode of Gross Science, Anna Rothschild helps connect tens of millions of seabirds in the Arctic to 40,000 metric tons of ammoni...

LEGO Dragon-Butterfly-Jet Magic Angle Sculpture

Created with layers and layers of LEGO pieces, magic angle sculptures appear to be completely abstract forms at first glance, but with the help of a light and rotation, they reveal their complex design. Inspired b...

Nature’s Scuba Divers – How Beetles Breathe Underwater

"Water beetles have been breathing underwater since before the dinosaurs existed,” said Crystal Maier, an entomologist at The Field Museum in Chicago. “It has evolved at least 10 times across the insect tree of life."...

Macro Video of Iridescent Soap Bubbles – Stereokroma

The next time you get the opportunity to blow some soap bubbles, be sure to take a long, close look at them. Those ever-changing rainbows sliding around across the surfaces of the bubbles can be spellbinding... like a...

Ferrofluid + Glow Sticks – The Physics Girl

Ferromagnetic + fluid = ferrofluid, a liquid containing nanoscale particles of magnetite, hematite, or an iron compound. Invented by NASA's Steve Papell in 1963, ferrofluid forms undulating spikes and patterns as it r...

Hot & Cold Water Science Experiment – HooplaKidzLab

With two matching jars, red and blue food coloring, some hot and cold water, an index card, and a dish or baking pan, you can observe how the different densities of hot and cold water behave. This experiment by Hoopla...

How Do Sharks and Rays Use Electricity to Find Hidden Prey?

Imagine if you had six traditional senses instead of five: Sound, sight, touch, smell, taste and... What might you pick? Echolocation? Magnetoreception? How about electroreception? Sharks, rays, skates and sawfish...

Resonance, forced vibration, and a tuning forks demo

A U-shaped fork of steel first invented in 1711 by trumpet player John Shore, the tuning fork is a tool produces a specific note that helps musicians keep their instruments in tune. They also are a great conversation ...

How Do Greenhouse Gases Actually Work?

The Earth and the Moon are essentially the same distance from the sun, yet the two rocks have very different surfaces thanks to our Earth's atmosphere. It shields us during the day, and at night, it traps enough heat ...

Seven surface tension experiments – Physics Girl

This Physics Girl video highlights seven different surface tension experiments that you can easily try at home or in the classroom. Have any of these around? A plate, a glass, a penny, an index card, a paperclip, an e...

Stanford researchers solve the mystery of the dancing droplets

This beautifully-made video about a beautifully-colored series of experiments from a Stanford research team showcases how a observing a few droplets of food coloring -- made of water and propylene glycol -- have led t...

How to Observe a Meteor Shower – Cal Academy

Get some blankets, find a dark hill on a dark night, make sure you've napped, and put away that smartphone. The California Academy of Sciences has some excellent tips for seeing shooting stars, more accurately known a...

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