Topic: molecules

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Nature’s Scuba Divers – How Beetles Breathe Underwater

"Water beetles have been breathing underwater since before the dinosaurs existed,” said Crystal Maier, an entomologist at The Field Museum in Chicago. “It has evolved at least 10 times across the insect tree of life."...

Macro Video of Iridescent Soap Bubbles – Stereokroma

The next time you get the opportunity to blow some soap bubbles, be sure to take a long, close look at them. Those ever-changing rainbows sliding around across the surfaces of the bubbles can be spellbinding... like a...

Ferrofluid + Glow Sticks – The Physics Girl

Ferromagnetic + fluid = ferrofluid, a liquid containing nanoscale particles of magnetite, hematite, or an iron compound. Invented by NASA's Steve Papell in 1963, ferrofluid forms undulating spikes and patterns as it r...

Hot & Cold Water Science Experiment – HooplaKidzLab

With two matching jars, red and blue food coloring, some hot and cold water, an index card, and a dish or baking pan, you can observe how the different densities of hot and cold water behave. This experiment by Hoopla...

How Do Sharks and Rays Use Electricity to Find Hidden Prey?

Imagine if you had six traditional senses instead of five: Sound, sight, touch, smell, taste and... What might you pick? Echolocation? Magnetoreception? How about electroreception? Sharks, rays, skates and sawfish...

Resonance, forced vibration, and a tuning forks demo

A U-shaped fork of steel first invented in 1711 by trumpet player John Shore, the tuning fork is a tool produces a specific note that helps musicians keep their instruments in tune. They also are a great conversation ...

How Do Greenhouse Gases Actually Work?

The Earth and the Moon are essentially the same distance from the sun, yet the two rocks have very different surfaces thanks to our Earth's atmosphere. It shields us during the day, and at night, it traps enough heat ...

Seven surface tension experiments – Physics Girl

This Physics Girl video highlights seven different surface tension experiments that you can easily try at home or in the classroom. Have any of these around? A plate, a glass, a penny, an index card, a paperclip, an e...

Stanford researchers solve the mystery of the dancing droplets

This beautifully-made video about a beautifully-colored series of experiments from a Stanford research team showcases how a observing a few droplets of food coloring -- made of water and propylene glycol -- have led t...

Cal Academy: How to Observe a Meteor Shower

Get some blankets, find a dark hill on a dark night, make sure you've napped, and put away that smartphone. The California Academy of Sciences has some excellent tips for seeing shooting stars, more accurately known a...

Deep Look: Banana Slugs and Secret of the Slime

Slime can trigger an immediate ewwwww! reaction, but ooey gooey slime is actually a rather brilliant, problem solving substance. One of the animals that depends on its slime can be found among the gigantic redwood for...

Soap Powered Boats – ExpeRimental

Send molecules flying with this super fun and easy science experiment for kids (and adults): The Soap Boat Water Experiment from The Royal Institution's ExpeRimental series. Comedian Rufus Hound and his son Alby make ...

Why Do Clouds Stay Up? – It’s Okay to Be Smart

Clouds are filled with so many water droplets that they're actually heavy... like 100 elephants heavy or a 747 airplane heavy! So why don't clouds fall out of the sky? It's Okay to Be Smart's Joe Hanson explains every...

This is NOT timelapse: the Aurora Borealis in real time

This breathtaking video of the Aurora Borealis is not a timelapse video — this is what it looks like in real time. It was filmed in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada by astro-ph...

Celebrating Crystallography – An adventure in structural analysis

One of the great innovations of the twentieth century is likely not well-known, but this video from the Ri Channel is looking to change that: This is X-ray crystallography.  Discovered in 1913 by William and Lawren...

It’s Okay To Be Smart: What is wind?

We were just watching how wind (and so many other things) can get going with the spin of the Earth, now let’s go deeper and find out more about what wind is with PBS’ Dr. Joe Hanson of It’s Okay To Be Sma...

Instant Ice Crystals – The Secret Life of Ice

From the BBC’s The Secret Life of Ice, an experiment for your DIY/ Gotta Try This list: Dr Gabrielle Walker and Dr Andrea Sella investigate the molecular make up of ice crystals. They use supercooled water to...

Kari Byron makes a cloud in a bottle

How do you make a cloud? On her show, Head Rush, Mythbuster’s Kari Byron demonstrates how clouds are formed by making one in a bottle. For this experiment, you can use a bicycle pump with a rubber stopper atta...

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