Topic: molluscs

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Scallops have lots of tiny eyes that act like tiny telescopes

Things you may not know about the marine bivalve molluscs called Pectinidae or scallops, as seen in the Hakai Institute video above: 1. They can swim freely for short distances to escape predators or relocate them...

How is a nautilus different from a squid?

Nautiluses are amazing creatures. They've survived five mass extinctions and can learn and remember, as demonstrated in maze experiments. They're also cephalopods, but they do a lot of things differently from octopuse...

Making lime with Primitive Technology

Making use of the unoccupied shells of native rainforest snails around his original land, Primitive Technology makes lime mortar by firing them in his pottery kiln, slaking the calcined shells with water so that they ...

Formation of a Pearl – Secret Life of Pearls

Australia’s northwest coastline is a stunning stretch of wilderness. Look beyond the shore and into the water, and you'll find more stunning sights, including Pinctada maxima, the Silver-Lipped Pearl Oyster. These ...

Cephalopod aquarists film tiny chambered nautilus hatchlings

After incubating over 150 nautilus eggs for more than 14 months, Monterey Bay Aquarium cephalopod aquarists are filming these tiny, fully-formed baby chambered nautiluses as they hatch in the aquarium's behind-the-sce...

The large and surprising creatures of InsecthausTV

Adrian Kozakiewicz went from being a young insect enthusiast in Germany to a professional insect breeder with a huge following on Instagram and Facebook. His videos, like the Rainbow Stag Beetles (Phalacrognathus muel...

A pacific razor clam burrows rapidly into the sand

Watch as a pacific razor clam (Siliqua Patula) rapidly burrows into the sand with its large foot. When it's almost completely buried, it ejects spouts of water, a reaction that a variety of razor clams are known for. ...

Under The Dock, a marine life series by Hakai Institute

Described as a fearsome predator on the British Columbia coast, sunflower sea stars "can grow to a diameter of one meter, and have a voracious appetite for all sorts of animals on the rocky reef." From Hakai Institute...

The melibe nudibranch grabs at food with a net-like mouth

This fascinating carnivorous sea slug is called a melibe leonina, a lion's mane sea slug, or a hooded nudibranch. The 'hood' refers to its large mouth that expands like a net to trap at small crustaceans and mollusks,...

The Amazing Shapes of Ammonites

Now extinct, ammonites are abundant, prehistoric sea molluscs that first appeared in the fossil record around 240 million years ago. The images of ammonites that we often see in museums and books are planispiral-shape...

Why is biodiversity so important? – TED Ed

Biodiversity, short for biological diversity, is the term we use for the variety of animals, plants, fungi, bacteria, and other intertwined life forms within any ecosystem... "from towering redwood trees to tiny, sing...

The Unlikely Tale of a Tenacious Snail – Science Friday

Not seen or collected for science since 1933, the oblong rocksnail of Alabama's Cahaba River was declared extinct in 2000. In 2011, biology grad student Nathan Whelan took a second look at a tiny rock he had picked up...

This Jorunna sea slug looks like a tiny, fluffy “sea bunny”

Sea bunnies, sesame-coated snow rabbits, ゴマフビロードウミウシ or gomafu biroodo umiushi meaning black speckled velvet sea slugs... These Jorunna Parva sea slugs look like white fluffy bunnies and have been given a v...

Banana Slugs and Secret of the Slime – Deep Look

Slime can trigger an immediate ewwwww! reaction, but ooey gooey slime is actually a rather brilliant, problem solving substance. One of the animals that depends on its slime can be found among the gigantic redwood for...

Ocean sponges have incredible filtering power

Ocean sponges are fascinating multi-cellular animals that don't walk or swim. They eat by filter-feeding, straining the water around them to capture organic debris particles and microscopic life forms. How powerfu...

Giant amber snail catches an earthworm

In the forests of New Zealand, among a wide variety of snails, are giant Powelliphanta or amber snails, "giant" meaning around the size of a man's fist (up to 91mm or 3.6 in long). These beautiful, endangered creature...

That’s about the size, a classic animation from Sesame Street

Classic Sesame Street time: That’s about the size.

Snail development time lapse: From embryo to hatching

Via skeptv, New Scientist reports on this time lapse video of snail development from embryo to hatching: Oliver Tills of Plymouth University, UK, and colleagues tracked the timing of 12 diff...

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