mongolia

Showing 3 posts tagged mongolia

From BBC’s Human Planet, watch Mongolian horsemen herd wild horses in order to first catch foals, and then wild mares for their milk.

Mongolia’s 2.4 million people are semi-nomadic and the horse is a huge part of their culture. The animals are key for travel, herding, hunting, and sport. From the American Musuem of Natural History

In the words of a herder who lives outside Ulaanbataar, Mongolia’s capital, “We Mongols respect horse as our companion of night and day. The horse is the source of joy and pride of a Mongolian herder. And we are nothing without our horses.”

Beyond Ulaanbataar, the horse is still the main means of transportation. Mongolian children learn to ride when they are as young as three years old. Horse racing is a favorite sport, and young children are often the jockeys, as the Mongolians believe the race tests the horse’s ability, not the rider’s.

Related watching: National Geographic Kids hosts this video about a horse race for Mongolian kids during the annual Festival of Naadam.

In the archives: watch how Mongolian gers are assembled.

Using his paraglider, photographer George Steinmetz flies above some of the most diverse and extreme deserts in the world… sand dunes, volcanic peaks, brightly colored hot springs, ancient cities, unusual farms, herds of wild animals… pattern upon amazing pattern. Look at them all online or find them in his book, Desert Air, after watching this video from National Geographic.

The nomadic people of Mongolia don’t stay in one place for long. That’s why they live in gers (which American’s know by the Russian name, yurt), a home that is fast and easy to assemble and disassemble. Putting up a ger (pronounced gair) is fast and easy, but its best done by an entire family. This ger was moved by the family of Shagdarsuren Herelchuluun, on the east side of Lake Hovsgol, in northern Mongolia, not far from the Russian border.

via BoingBoing