mountains

Showing 18 posts tagged mountains

There’s a cliff wall full of 70 million year old dinosaur footprints in Spain’s Pyrenees mountains, just a 1.5 hour drive north from Barcelona. In this episode of Jurassic CSI, Walk Like a Dinosaur, Dr. Phil Manning, head of Paleontology Research Group at University of Manchester, joins paleontologists from The Catalan Institute of Paleontology as they climb down the former mud plain to measure the extremely fragile footprints by hand. They also use long range LiDAR 3D scanning to capture the rock face and later calculate the animals’ dimensions, how fast they might have walked, and more.

Here’s a Catalan News Agency video for more info, some Jurassic CSI Facts, and in the archives: more dinosaur vids, including 3D scanning and Printing Dinosaurs.

This sommerrodelbahn alpine coaster in Mieders, Austria, has been on our Must Do list since we saw this viral video a few years ago. The video above is from the same 2.8km (1.7 mile) summer mountain coaster and follows a brave 6 year old lad down 640 meters (2100 feet) into the valley, over fields and bridges, through the woods and countless switchbacks, all at a pretty quick pace!

More rides: Coney Island Love Letter and The Centrifuge Brain Project.

From The New York Times, Olympics 2014: The Science of Snowmaking

Machines make snow the same way nature does, by freezing water droplets. But they do it a few feet above the ground, rather than in the much colder conditions high in the atmosphere. Snowmaking machines employ a few thermodynamic tricks to help, but at times there is a limit to what physics can do…

…a droplet may not freeze entirely during the few seconds it takes to fall to the ground — what snowmakers call hang time.

“We’re basically making eggs,” Mr. Moulton said — icy shells around still-liquid centers.

Related snow videos: when nature handles it, How Is Snow Made?

This papercraft pop-up book illustrates how South America and Africa used to be connected, how the supercontinent Pangaea broke apart 200 million years ago, how the Earth's seven primary tectonic plates are ever-shifting, and much more in this TED-Ed by educator Michael Molina: The Pangaea Pop-up.

There’s more paper-inspired science storytelling in the archives, including The Animated Life of A.R. Wallace, stop-motion shorts by Studio Nos, Whale Fall (After Life of a Whale), and another pop-up book: Revolution ( Life Cycle of a Drop of Water).