Topic: museum

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Why is it so hard to catch a fly? A visit to The Robot Zoo

Why is it so hard to catch a fly? Maddie Moate and Greg Foot visit the Horniman Museum's Robot Zoo in London to answer that curious question and a few other questions with help from some delightful robot animal counte...

The Squid and the Whale: Evidence for an Epic Encounter

One of the most famous dioramas in the American Museum of Natural History depicts a battle between two gigantic animals: the sperm whale and giant squid. But unlike most dioramas in the Museum’s halls, this scene has ...

Witnessing butterflies emerge at the California Academy of Sciences

Within the California Academy of Sciences' rainforest exhibit, butterflies and moths emerge from their chrysalis and cocoons in a specially designed emergence display. Biologist Tim Wong shows how they set up the clim...

Sara Berman’s Closet

"And here we are, in the midst of elaborate trappings, of elaborate lives: An illumination of how important a modest life can be. This closet, all lined up with military precision and loving care, represents the unend...

The Archaeology of Crossrail and the history of London

The construction of London’s newest railway, which will be known as the Elizabeth line when services begin in 2018, has given archaeologists a unique chance to explore some of the city’s most historically important si...

Relighting “Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque)” by Georges Seurat

French post-Impressionist painter Georges Seurat is well-known for his pointillism technique and for his depictions of life in the late 1800s. In observing his painting Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque), we see these...

Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrors

Step inside Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama's Infinity Mirror rooms, seemingly endless spaces made from mirrors, patterns, darkness, and light. The six rooms were filmed by NPR at Washington D.C.'s Hirshhorn Museum, wher...

The Art and Science of Conservation at the Freer Gallery of Art

The conservation and scientific research of ancient Asian art takes a large team of experts from many fields. In order to bring thousands of treasures from the East to the galleries of the Smithsonian in downtown Wash...

An Automaton of Marie Antoinette, The Dulcimer Player

From the 2012 exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, take a closer look at a unique piece of automata: David Roentgen's Automaton of Queen Marie A...

The World’s First Poo Museum

How might you preserve scat -- an animal's fecal dropping, poo, or poop -- for the world's first poo museum? ...or pooseum? In this BBC Earth Unplugged episode, Maddie Moate visits with Daniel Roberts, co-founder ...

A sonata played on the earliest known surviving piano

What does the earliest known surviving piano sound like? Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, listen to the 'Giga' of Sonata number 6 in B flat major, played by professional keyboard player and music producer D...

Scott Weaver’s ‘Rolling through the Bay’ toothpick sculpture

This nine foot tall wooden sculpture of San Francisco was made with glue and 105,387 and a half toothpicks. It was built by Scott Weaver who, stuck at home at the age of 14 with spinal meningitis, started working in e...

Curious Contraptions by automata artist Paul Spooner

Via the new Curious Contraptions exhibition at San Francisco's Exploratorium, meet artist and mechanic Paul Spooner. Within a community of British makers, Spooner created over 40 whimsical kinetic sculptures for The C...

Building Art Machines with LEGO Technic pieces

From The Tinkering Studio located at San Francisco's Exploratorium, enjoy these pattern making art machines built with LEGO Technic beams, gears, and pins. The Tinkering team wrote up a quick art machines experiment g...

The Amazing Shapes of Ammonites

Now extinct, ammonites are abundant, prehistoric sea molluscs that first appeared in the fossil record around 240 million years ago. The images of ammonites that we often see in museums and books are planispiral-shape...

Portrait of Innovation: James Conway Farley

Born to enslaved parents in Prince Edward County, Virginia on August 10, 1854, James Conway Farley became the country's first prominent African American photographer, winning awards for his work, as well as enduring t...

Installing massive statues with engineering and care at the Met

How do you move and install a three ton statue circa 170 BC? How do you move and install a ten ton statue? In these behind-the-scenes time lapse video from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, we get to se...

Theo Jansen’s Strandbeest on the beach in San Francisco

Join Adam Savage as he talks with Dutch physicist-turned-artist Theo Jansen. The subject: Strandbeests -- “beach animals” in Dutch. For the very first time, Jansen has brought his wind-fueled kinetic sculptures to win...

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