Topic: museum

Sort: Date | Title | Sort Ascending
View:

Automata artist Matt Smith and his Curious Contraptions

Born in 1965, Matt Smith spent about six weeks at the Falmouth School of Art before deciding he would rather spend his time "making silly things." He began making automata in 1980 and, in 1986, formed the Fourteen Bal...

Henry Fox Talbot, the First Photographs, and the Pioneers of Photography

The invention of the photograph, in 1839, would forever change the way people looked at the world. But this extraordinary breakthrough cannot be credited to a single individual—while William Henry Fox Talbot labored q...

The meticulous work that goes into running the Museum of Modern Art

Go behind-the-scenes with multiple teams at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City as they prepare for two exhibition openings, Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait and Max Ernst: Beyond Painting. The video abov...

Making a new felted kimono coat from recycled sweaters

What if every company we buy clothes from offered to take back those clothes and reuse the materials to create new garments? This Cooper Hewitt video captures the creation of a felted Kimono Coat made from recycled Ei...

The Challenge of a Straight Line and ‘Making Art Concrete’ – Getty Museum

How might you paint a perfectly sharp and clean straight line without blobs of paint or an unsteady hand creating a visually uneven edge? In concert with the Getty Museum's exhibition “Making Art Concrete: Works f...

Why are museum collections so important? Sir David Attenborough explains

Museums like the American Museum of Natural History may, at first, seem to be sharing their entire scientific collections in the public displays of their grand halls, but when scientists need specimens for research, t...

Why is it so hard to catch a fly? A visit to The Robot Zoo

Why is it so hard to catch a fly? Maddie Moate and Greg Foot visit the Horniman Museum's Robot Zoo in London to answer that curious question and a few other questions with help from some delightful robot animal counte...

The Squid and the Whale: Evidence for an Epic Encounter

One of the most famous dioramas in the American Museum of Natural History depicts a battle between two gigantic animals: the sperm whale and giant squid. But unlike most dioramas in the Museum’s halls, this scene has ...

Witnessing butterflies emerge at the California Academy of Sciences

Within the California Academy of Sciences' rainforest exhibit, butterflies and moths emerge from their chrysalis and cocoons in a specially designed emergence display. Biologist Tim Wong shows how they set up the clim...

Sara Berman’s Closet

"And here we are, in the midst of elaborate trappings, of elaborate lives: An illumination of how important a modest life can be. This closet, all lined up with military precision and loving care, represents the unend...

The Archaeology of Crossrail and the history of London

The construction of London’s newest railway, which will be known as the Elizabeth line when services begin in 2018, has given archaeologists a unique chance to explore some of the city’s most historically important si...

Relighting “Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque)” by Georges Seurat

French post-Impressionist painter Georges Seurat is well-known for his pointillism technique and for his depictions of life in the late 1800s. In observing his painting Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque), we see these...

Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrors

Step inside Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama's Infinity Mirror rooms, seemingly endless spaces made from mirrors, patterns, darkness, and light. The six rooms were filmed by NPR at Washington D.C.'s Hirshhorn Museum, wher...

The Art and Science of Conservation at the Freer Gallery of Art

The conservation and scientific research of ancient Asian art takes a large team of experts from many fields. In order to bring thousands of treasures from the East to the galleries of the Smithsonian in downtown Wash...

An Automaton of Marie Antoinette, The Dulcimer Player

From the 2012 exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, take a closer look at a unique piece of automata: David Roentgen's Automaton of Queen Marie A...

The World’s First Poo Museum

How might you preserve scat -- an animal's fecal dropping, poo, or poop -- for the world's first poo museum? ...or pooseum? In this BBC Earth Unplugged episode, Maddie Moate visits with Daniel Roberts, co-founder ...

A sonata played on the earliest known surviving piano

What does the earliest known surviving piano sound like? Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, listen to the 'Giga' of Sonata number 6 in B flat major, played by professional keyboard player and music producer D...

Scott Weaver’s ‘Rolling through the Bay’ toothpick sculpture

This nine foot tall wooden sculpture of San Francisco was made with glue and 105,387 and a half toothpicks. It was built by Scott Weaver who, stuck at home at the age of 14 with spinal meningitis, started working in e...

« Prev


 
Not finding what you're looking for? A few suggestions:
• Fewer words might give better results. Look up cats instead of funny cats.
• No need to search with the words videos or for kids included.
• Use related words: If searching for iceberg isn't working, try ice or glacier.
• Is everything spelled correctly?
• Browsing topics might help, too!