museum

Showing 34 posts tagged museum

Watch young David Attenborough try to piece together a massive broken egg shell (given to him by locals) in this 1961 clip from Zoo Quest to Madagascar: The Elephant Bird Egg.

The Elephant Bird was a large, ostrich or emu-like, flightless bird that lived on the island of Madagascar until its extinction, likely in the 17th or 18th century. How tall was it? From Wikipedia

Aepyornis, believed to have been more than 3 m (10 ft) tall and weighing close to 400 kg (880 lb), was at the time the world’s largest bird. Remains of Aepyornis adults and eggs have been found; in some cases the eggs have a circumference of more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) and a length up to 34 cm (13 in). The egg volume is about 160 times greater than that of a chicken egg.

Below, Sir David visits the Elephant Bird’s skeleton in a museum in the capital city of Antananarivo:

In the archives, Madagascar’s Giraffe Weevilweaver birds weaving and dancing Clark’s Grebes.

In 1961, an interactive exhibition called Mathematica: A World of Numbers… and Beyond inaugurated the new science wing at Los Angeles’ California Museum of Science and Industry. Sponsored by IBM, it was an innovative exhibit designed by husband and wife team Charles and Ray Eames, and lucky for us, it included five short animations that explored a handful of math concepts. Watch three of our favorites:

Above, 2ⁿ – “a story about the exponential growth of numbers raised to powers.” Below, Symmetry and testing for degrees of it:

Also, Topology – how a closed curve dissects a plane into inside and outside sections:

And in the archives, don’t miss this iconic Eames film: Powers of Ten.

via Tinybop.

The next time that you’re in your local natural history museum, don’t just look at the large animals in the dioramas — really look for those hidden small animals, too: a brown-headed cowbird near a bison, a Botta’s pocket gopher peeking from a burrow, or a Blue Echo Butterfly on a flower. These smaller details in scenes get as much attention from museum staff as the central figures. 

Above, the American Museum of Natural History's Conservation Fellow Bethany Palumbo describes how she studied museum specimens of the Blue Echo to recreate it using a mix of photocopying, hand painting, and sculpting with layers of glue.

New York’s AMNH made a series of excellent videos about their dioramas from their 2012 restoration efforts

Every detail was studied for accuracy, down to the cougar’s whisker texture:

Even the shadows, background paintings, and native grasses demand proper attention to detail. After new, energy-efficient lights were installed, museum artist Stephen C. Quinn even altered the slight color variations of the crushed marble dust “snow” to better represent the moon shadows in the Wolf Diorama

Related watching: Ancient Ancestors Come to Life, How to Make a Large Crocodile Sculpture, Anatomy of Preservation, and Paleontology 101.

h/t Sagan Sense.

From the Pérez Art Museum Miami’s exhibition, AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft, this is Adrian Esparza’s Wake and Wonder, a 12 x 30 foot installation rewoven from a Mexican serape blanket into colorful, geometric patterns on the museum’s walls.

This looks like some wonderful DIY-inspiration around these parts. The exhibition continues until May 2015.

Watch more videos from museums.

via Design Boom.

In this time lapse video, nature history and prehistoric life modeler Gary Staab studies, welds, sculpts, and paints to create a large crocodile sculpture with his team. Staab has worked for clients like National Geographic, the American Museum of Natural History, Walt Disney Animation, and the Smithsonian. This sculpture will tour the United States in an exhibition called “Crocs — Ancient Predators in a Modern World.”

Related watching: paleo-artist John GurcheFlorentijn Hofman’s Feestaardvarken (Partyaardvark), and The Secret Story of Toys.

Thanks, Michael.