ocean

Showing 23 posts tagged ocean

In a mix of artistry, geometry, and technology, San Francisco-based Earthscape artist Andres Amador creates massive sketches in the beach sand – sometimes geometric, and sometimes more abstract and serendipitous – using rakes and ropes. The designs are temporary; where the waves don’t wash away his work, walking beach visitors and the wind will naturally muddy and dissolve the precise lines.

Amador has become keenly aware of how impermanent his work is, and has embraced nature’s tidal rhythm, starting one hour before low tide and continuing to work until an hour afterward. In this KQED Arts video, he explains: 

People are really… they’re enthralled that i would do something that is destined to wash away. That really strikes a chord with people because really, truly, it’s the story of our lives. Our lives are impermanent, and the tide is unstoppable.

And though this art form is tied directly to nature, Amador makes great use of modern technology. The designs can be both checked and appreciated-in-full from high above the beach using a remote controlled helicopter.

To see more from high above, visit AndresAmadorArts.com or view more photos here.

In the archives, two other incredible beach art videos: One Plastic Beach and Theo Jansen’s wind-fueled Strandbeests.

From KQED.

From the BBC’s Ocean Giants documentary, watch this incredible clip to hear the extraordinary and mysterious song of the Humpback Whale. Why do they sing (or hum)? Does it serve a purpose? Are they making music for pleasure? Are they talking?

If this clip disappears, you can find the entire documentary on Amazon. And in the archives: watch more whale videos, including a surprise diving encounter with a Humpback Whalethis huge baby Sperm Whale, and Whale Fall (After Life of a Whale).

This papercraft pop-up book illustrates how South America and Africa used to be connected, how the supercontinent Pangaea broke apart 200 million years ago, how the Earth's seven primary tectonic plates are ever-shifting, and much more in this TED-Ed by educator Michael Molina: The Pangaea Pop-up.

There’s more paper-inspired science storytelling in the archives, including The Animated Life of A.R. Wallace, stop-motion shorts by Studio Nos, Whale Fall (After Life of a Whale), and another pop-up book: Revolution ( Life Cycle of a Drop of Water).

Sea Level! What is it and how do scientists calculate it? As it turns out, there are actually many complexities in determining this measurement. For example, Earth isn’t actually a sphere, gravity is stronger and weaker at different points around the globe, and of course, there are a lot of mountains that are no where near water — so how do we know what sea level would be? In this video, Minute Physics explains the details.

After you’ve watched, check out these related links: ellipsoid, geoidgeodesists, Mount Everest, Chimborazo Volcano, Space.com’s Best Gravity Map Yet Shows a Lumpy, Bumpy Earth, and this clarifying and not-to-be-missed animated gif of Earth’s gravity field.

In the archives: videos about or involving measuring things, including Measuring the Universe.