Topic: optical toys

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Rainbow in Your Hand

This is Masashi Kawamura's Rainbow in Your Hand. Kawamura also worked on the Japanese television show Pitagora Suitchi. In the archives: more flipbooks.

Experimental animation meets pottery: zoetrope bowl

Mixing pottery with zoetropes sounds like just our thing: Experimental animation meets pottery is a short film by Jim Le Fevre, Mike Paterson, and RAMP ceramics' Roop and Alice Johnstone, commissio...

Amazing T-Rex Illusion

This T-Rex will turn its head to watch you as you move. But how?? YouTube illusionist Brusspup shares the secret with this Jerry Andrus-inspired trick. And if you want to try it out yourself, Brusspup made these green...

Juan Fontanive’s mechanical flip books of hummingbirds

Artist Juan Fontanive's kinetic sculptures also happen to be beautifully illustrated, mechanical flip books. Above, Colibri, graphite and colored pencil on paper, stainless steel, delrin, motor, electronics. 20...

A Kinetic Mind: the kinetic sculptures of Anthony Howe

A Kinetic Mind by Elizabeth Rudge introduces the kinetic sculptures of artist Anthony Howe. The sculptures are visually interesting patterns when still, but are mesmerizing when the wind powers their spinning, ro...

A Basic Demonstration of Optical Cloaking

Above, A Basic Demonstration of Optical Cloaking. Cloaking is a term for hiding an object from view at specific frequencies, but evidently one can cloak things DIY-style with four mirrors a...

Amazing Anamorphic Illusions

There’s nothing that twists the mind quite like an optical illusion and this one is pretty great. From Brusspup, who has previously created scanimation toys (among many other optical tricks), check out the video...

How to make a spinning top

I love Origami's Jo Nakashima demonstrates how to make a Spinning Top, designed by Yami Yamauchi. To make one, just print this image, cut it out as an 18cm x 18cm square, and fold! From the ar...

Scanimated Optical Illusion

YouTube’s Brusspup specializes in optical illusion videos that are inspired by the animation concepts in the book Magic Moving Images, and in scanimation books like Gallop!. In this video,...

Magic Moving Images

A little tour of the book Magic Moving Images by Colin Ord. From the archives: optical toys.

Impossible motion illusions

Kokichi Sugihara at Meiji University in Kawasaki, Japan, has been using computer software to bring impossible drawings to life. The video above shows some of the objects he has made moving in ways that appear to d...

Making Of… Moray McLaren – We Got Time

Created, drawn and colored by the director David Wilson, this “how to” about the making of a music video is an excellent primer for how the praxinoscope works.

Matthew Shlian: cut out flipbook

A flip book video by paper engineer, TEDx speaker, and artist Matt Shlian, who also makes paper sculptures and videos of his intricate flip books and small paper installations. A few favorites are here, here and (don...

How to make your own thaumatrope

Cut out a white cardboard circle. On the front, draw something on the left. On the back, draw something upside down on the right. Punch two holes in the sides of the circle, as shown above, and thread string through e...

The Phonotrope (formerly the Phonographantasmascope)

This video (which picks up at about 40 seconds) is by the fascinating Jim Le Fevre,” a BAFTA and British Animation Award winning free-lance film maker mostly working in animation” who experiments with (wha...

The praxinoscope

This is a praxinoscope. It was invented in France in 1877 by Charles-Émile Reynaud. Like the zoetrope, it used a strip of pictures placed around the inner surface of a spinning cylinder. The praxinoscope improved...

Pixar’s Zoetrope and how animation works

An introduction to the zoetrope from the team at Pixar, who wanted to show exactly how animation works. In 3D. The zoetrope consists of a cylinder with slits cut vertically in the sides. On the inner surface of ...

Little Music Flipbook

Flipbooks (and making them) are little bits of magic.

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