optical toys

Showing 19 posts tagged optical toys

Mixing pottery with zoetropes sounds like just our thing: Experimental animation meets pottery is a short film by Jim Le Fevre, Mike Paterson, and RAMP ceramics' Roop and Alice Johnstone, commissioned by the Crafts Council. How does it work? 

The film is based upon the principles of the Zoetrope - the difference being that instead of the slits that one would have in the drum around the side of the Zoetrope, it uses the shutter speed of the camera instead.

Jim used 19 ‘frames’ on the pot – a good balance of space per frame (about 4 cm at the outside of the bowl) and amount of animation (0.7 of a second per loop).

To get it up to speed it was simply pressing the floor lever gently until it was perfect in-frame for the camera (essentially it would be 78rpm and so therefore would work on a traditional 78 deck).

We’ve seen Le Fevre’s work here before: The Phonotrope. Plus, there are more videos of amazing optical toys in the archives, including this gem on Pixar’s 3D zoetrope.

via It’s Nice That.

Artist Juan Fontanive's kinetic sculptures also happen to be beautifully illustrated, mechanical flip books.

Above, Colibri, graphite and colored pencil on paper, stainless steel, delrin, motor, electronics. 2011. Below, Violetearacrylic and graphite on paper, stainless steel, delrin, aluminum, motor and electronics. 2011.

Watch videos with more birdsmore flip books, and more kinetic sculptures

via Colossal.

A Kinetic Mind by Elizabeth Rudge introduces the kinetic sculptures of artist Anthony Howe. The sculptures are visually interesting patterns when still, but are mesmerizing when the wind powers their spinning, rotating, reflecting, interweaving… 

Watch A Cloud Light, above, or check out Octo, or maybe this standing Vlast-O-Spline, though this Bob-sythe is rather incredible… what’s your favorite?

More videos: the Randall Museum’s Windswept and Theo Jansen’s Strandbeests.

Thanks, @mindfulmimi. h/t Colossal.