oxygen

Showing 12 posts tagged oxygen

What’s happening when a match is lit? From Answers.com

Matches contain sulfur, glass powder, and an oxidizing agent as the components in the match head. When you strike a match, the friction due to the particles of glass powder rubbing together generates enough heat to convert some of the red phosphorous to white phosphorous, which burns in the presence of oxygen gas. The heat from the friction also causes the oxidizing agent to produce oxygen gas, igniting the small amount of white phosphorous. Once ignited, the oxygen gas fuels the flame while the rest of the sulfur catches on fire. Of course, this entire process happens in a fraction of a second.

…unless, of course, someone films it at 4000 frames per second, and then you really get to spend time with all of the macro, slow-motion details. Fascinating to watch, and a great conversation starter about fire prevention and safety tips, and using matches as tools.

Related watching: Why do hot things glow?, firefighter helmet cam, and Smokey and The Little Boy.

Thanks, @_thp.

How can we know the size, composition, and atmospheric makeup of distant exoplanets? NASA explains the details in this Alien Atmospheres video. 

By observing periodic variations in the parent star’s brightness and color, astronomers can indirectly determine an exoplanet’s distance from its star, its size, and its mass. But to truly understand an exoplanet astronomers must study its atmosphere, and they do so by splitting apart the parent star’s light during a planetary transit. 

Watch more astronomy videos, including Measuring the Universe and The Hubble Ultra Deep Field.

via Boing Boing.

This unusual underwater journey in South Africa involves kayaking legend, French expat, and mad inventor Olivier Feuillette, and a modified kayak. With a waterproof top, a ballast (so that it will sink), scuba tanks for oxygen, a CO2 filter, an oscillating fishtail, and pedals, Feuillette’s SUBO becomes a one-person submarine that’s ready to go where no kayak has gone before.

via Devour.

Watch YouTube user Xraise Cornell create a homemade horizontal vortex ring generatorWhen a small burst of air is released into a toroidal or poloidal vortex — essentially a spinning donut of water — it shapes the air into its own ring along the water’s trajectory, creating a vortex ring or a bubble ring.

While we have not made this invention (yet), it looks like a lot of fun. Or of course, with a lot of practice, you could try to make them with no materials at all, just like the dolphins do. Just remember to always be safe. Adult supervision is recommended when using tools or trying experiments underwater.

Or if you want to stay dry, try making a homemade vortex cannon with a tightly closed box with a narrow round hole at the end. Watch!

And here I thought this was just an animated gif, but no, via Daily Picks & Flicks, there’s a video of a diver making a bubble ring or vortex ring, above.

A vortex ring is the phenomenon where a quantity of fluid or gas in a toroid (donut) shape, travels through a medium of fluid or gas, while spinning like a thick circular bracelet that is being rolled off of a person’s arm. (Except the spin is in the opposite direction as when a bracelet is rolled off in this way.)

And evidently there are a series of videos from this diver. Here are two more:

Are these videos real? Yes, we’re pretty sure they are. So how exactly is this done? A small burst of air is released into a toroidal or poloidal vortex, essentially a spinning donut of water. 

Bubble rings are actually made of two different rings, one inside the other, spinning in the same direction. The outer ring is made of water, and the inner one is made of air… 

From YouTube User Maxwel Hohn, How to make a horizontal bubble ring:

Just remember to always be safe when underwater. Please conduct all experiments with adult supervision. 

Related watching: make your own underwater vortex ring generator, make a homemade vortex cannon, or the viral video of cetaceans blowing bubble rings.