painting

Showing 15 posts tagged painting

Imagine sky writing on the ground using water and a modified tricycle – this is Water Calligraphy Device by French Canadian media artist Nicholas Hanna

Inspired by the water and brush calligraphy of older artists in his local Beijing parks, Hanna converted a Beijing tricycle, called a san lun che, to digitally “paint” (or more accurately drip) Chinese characters onto the sidewalk. The characters write out Dongcheng District Propaganda phrases that are on banners and housing developments in the district.

The trike would catch quite a bit of attention in the streets, as seen in these two 2011 videos by Jonah Kessel. According to Kessel, the tricycle drips:

营造 未成年人健康成长的良好环境
Create a good environment for minors to grow up healthy

文明从脚下起步 奉献从身边做起
Civilization comes from every individual, to contribute from every little thing

树文明新风 做文明市民
Be a civilized citizen and build a civilized new atmosphere for constructing s cultured and civilized city

共建文明城区 共享美好家园
Build a civilized city for everyone to share a beautiful home altogether

做文明有礼北京人 建和谐魅力新东城
Be civilized and polite Beijingers, to build a harmonious charm new Dong Cheng district together

美德贵在坚持 文明重在行动
Virtue shows through long term persistence, civilization reflects by actions

和谐东城 你我共建
Harmonious Dong Cheng District constructed by you and me

建全国文明城区 做东城文明市民
Constructs the national civilized district, to be the civilized citizen of Dong Cheng District

The project was first shown at Beijing Design Week in 2011. Hanna now lives in Los Angeles where he works as an artist and designer.

Related videos in the archives: Robo-rainbow and Osaka City Station’s “water printer” fountain.

Sesame Street’s Mad Painter paints the number 7, starring Paul Benedict and featuring Stockard Channing and Jerome Raphel. We especially love the jaunty silent film-style music. After this, watch the number 4, the number 5, the number 6, the number 9, the number 10, the number 11, and the numbers 3 and 8 below:

There’s more classic Sesame Street in the archives, including How Crayons are Made, Three Striped Balls & a Polka-dot Ball, Shape Organization, and Old Paper, New Paper.

The next time that you’re in your local natural history museum, don’t just look at the large animals in the dioramas — really look for those hidden small animals, too: a brown-headed cowbird near a bison, a Botta’s pocket gopher peeking from a burrow, or a Blue Echo Butterfly on a flower. These smaller details in scenes get as much attention from museum staff as the central figures. 

Above, the American Museum of Natural History's Conservation Fellow Bethany Palumbo describes how she studied museum specimens of the Blue Echo to recreate it using a mix of photocopying, hand painting, and sculpting with layers of glue.

New York’s AMNH made a series of excellent videos about their dioramas from their 2012 restoration efforts

Every detail was studied for accuracy, down to the cougar’s whisker texture:

Even the shadows, background paintings, and native grasses demand proper attention to detail. After new, energy-efficient lights were installed, museum artist Stephen C. Quinn even altered the slight color variations of the crushed marble dust “snow” to better represent the moon shadows in the Wolf Diorama

Related watching: Ancient Ancestors Come to Life, How to Make a Large Crocodile Sculpture, Anatomy of Preservation, and Paleontology 101.

h/t Sagan Sense.