paleontology

Showing 10 posts tagged paleontology

There’s a cliff wall full of 70 million year old dinosaur footprints in Spain’s Pyrenees mountains, just a 1.5 hour drive north from Barcelona. In this episode of Jurassic CSI, Walk Like a Dinosaur, Dr. Phil Manning, head of Paleontology Research Group at University of Manchester, joins paleontologists from The Catalan Institute of Paleontology as they climb down the former mud plain to measure the extremely fragile footprints by hand. They also use long range LiDAR 3D scanning to capture the rock face and later calculate the animals’ dimensions, how fast they might have walked, and more.

Here’s a Catalan News Agency video for more info, some Jurassic CSI Facts, and in the archives: more dinosaur vids, including 3D scanning and Printing Dinosaurs.

"The human story is really nothing short of the story of a little corner of the universe becoming aware of itself." From National Geographic, paleo-artist John Gurche creates realistic human likenesses of our ancient ancestors. You can see them almost come to life at the Smithsonian’s Hall of Human Origins.

In the archives: more history, more humanity, and more evolution.

Travel a span of 160 years, from the world’s first dinosaur exhibition, based on the scientific findings of 1854, to a multi-million dollar exhibition that aims to be the most scientifically accurate representation of dinosaurs ever.

In this clip from BBC Earth, Dr Alice Roberts visits Dinosaur Court at London’s Crystal Palace and then talks with Luis Chiappe, curator and director of the Dinosaur Institute at the Natural History Museum in Los Angeles. He and his team are preparing a dinosaur exhibition that will not only showcase the facts that we know about dinosaurs, but will explain why we know them.

Watch more from the BBC and more videos about dinosaurs.

Meet Siats (pronounced SEE-otts) Meekerorum, the first giant mega-predator to be discovered in North America — specifically in the Utah desert — in over 60 years. In this Untamed Science video, we hear from Dr. Lindsay Zanno, Director of the Paleontology & Geology Research Laboratory at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, who explains how this 30 foot long, 4-ton, carnivorous creature flourished in the tens of millions of years before T-Rex ruled.

Untamed Science has visited Dr. Zanno before: Paleontology 101, a must-watch for anyone who loves dinosaurs.

via Scientific American.

Well-preserved, thanks to just the right combination of conditions over 72 million years, a 16 foot (5 meter) long dinosaur tail has been unearthed by paleontologists in Coahuila, MexicoBased on evidence, the excavation team believes that the tail could have been from a duck-billed hadrosaur, and they hope to locate more of the dinosaur’s body deeper underground. From Yahoo:

A group of locals discovered the fossil in June 2012. Paleontologists with INAH and the National Autonomous University of Mexico spent about a year surveying the area, and began their excavation on July 2… 

Aside from providing a valuable addition to the world’s limited collection of intact dinosaur fossils, the team hopes their findings will help explain the mechanics of how hadrosaur tails moved…

Finding the remains of this web-footed herbivore in such good condition is rare, and will add to the information gathered from previous discoveries. Related hadrosaur reading should include Dakota, the 67 million year old "mummified" hadrosaur that was excavated in North Dakota in 2006.

Watch more paleontology videos.

h/t @pourmecoffee.