paper

Showing 49 posts tagged paper

The geometry of folding meets fashion in this video for German designer Jule Waibel and her collection of 25 paper dresses. Folded from huge sheets of colorfully designed paper, they were displayed in the shop windows of 25 Bershka flagship stores around the world in January 2014: 25 dresses for 25 cities.

There are more photos of the project on her site.

Watch more videos about clothes and paper. Related watching: origami.

via Fubiz.

Watch Denver-based Deepti Nair and Harikrishnan Panicker build Rise and Skate, a six foot by six foot paper cut light box for skateboard art fundraiser Bordo Bello at the AIGA National Center, New York. On their work, from Black Book

They started experimenting with paper cut shadow boxes in 2010 with hand painted watercolor paper which was then cut and assembled in a wooden box to create a diorama, with years of practice their art became more intricate and minimal at the same time. They started experimenting with lights and simplified their pieces by losing the colored aspect of the paper. They have since then evolved to add their own style of paper cut art incorporating back-lit light boxes using flexible LED strip lights.

More of their work:

In the archives: more stunning paper projects, including ones by Irving Harper, Ödland, and Rob Ryan.

via Colossal.

We just tried this super easy Reversing Arrow Illusion, and it is, in fact, super easy. Draw two left-pointing arrows on a piece of paper and then put a clear, empty glass between you and those arrows. When you pour water into the glass, you’ll see something that you might not expect. How exactly did that happen? From Physics Central

No, you aren’t going crazy and you haven’t found yourself with Alice in Wonderland staring at arrows pointing in opposite directions.  In fact, you have just demonstrated a physics concept called refraction, the bending of light.

When the arrow is moved to a particular distance behind the glass, it looks like it reversed itself. When light passes from one material to another, it can bend or refract. In the experiment that you just completed, light traveled from the air, through the glass, through the water, through the back of the glass, and then back through the air, before hitting the arrow. Anytime that light passes from one medium, or material, into another, it refracts.

Just because light bends when it travels through different materials, doesn’t explain why the arrow reverses itself.  To explain this, you must think about the glass of water as if it is a magnifying glass. When light goes through a magnifying glass the light bends toward the center. Where the light all comes together is called the focal point, but beyond the focal point the image appears to reverse because the light rays that were bent pass each other and the light that was on the right side is now on the left and the left on the right, which makes the arrow appear to be reversed.

Related mind-benders: the amazing T-Rex illusiona basic demonstration of optical cloaking, and from ASAPscience, Can you trust your eyes?

via The Awesomer.

This 8cm long chameleon may look lifelike, but it’s actually made from paper, gears, a magnet, and a bit of professional watercolor work, all by papercraft artist Johan Scherft. The video above, featured at The Automata Blog, walks through how the automaton moves. Bonus wow moment: there’s a mirror making the build possible.

After this, watch more incredible automata videos.

via @roseveleth.