particles

Showing 12 posts tagged particles

From the team at Kurzgesagt, let’s explore what we know about The Beginning of Everything — The Big Bang:

Has the universe a beginning or was it here since forever? Well, evidence suggests that there was indeed a starting point to this universe we are part of right now. But how can this be? How can something come from nothing? And what about time? We don’t have all the answers yet so let’s talk about what we know. 

Previously on this site: Take a trip through The Solar System — our home in space, plus more about The Big Bang, including Carl Sagan’s cosmic calendar and the last five minutes of How the Universe Works: Extreme Stars.

Thanks, Philipp.

This breathtaking video of the Aurora Borealis is not a time-lapse video — this is what it looks like in real time. It was filmed in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada by astro-photographer Kwon O Chul, and not only displays the bright northern lights and these rather magical looking glowing teepees, but also sets them to the awed, ambient sounds of tourists in the cold night air.

A related must-watch: How the Aurora Borealis is created.

From the Ri Channel's View the Tales from the Prep Room series, this is how you make a fluidized bed of sand: Making Sand Swim. Watch how these solids suddenly behave a lot like a fluid as air escapes between the sand particles, causing them to float. It’s definitely one of the more strange and fascinating demonstrations that we’ve seen. 

Related watching: ScienceDemo.org, and at RIGB.org, a video list that I put together for The Royal Institution that has our favorite STEM videos for kids… well, at least some of our favorites. There are so many.

TodayTEDxCERN and TED-Ed have unveiled the first of 5 animated lessons specially developed by CERN scientists for TEDxCERN and brought to life by the talented animators at TED-Ed: “The beginning of the universe, for beginners.”

The lesson, which you can watch above(!) and at ed.ted.com, was conceived by CERN physicist Tom Whyntie and explains how cosmologists and particle physicists explore questions like, “How did the universe begin? How is it expanding?” by replicating the heat, energy, and activity of the first few seconds of our universe, right after the Big Bang.

via SaganSense.