photographer

Showing 12 posts tagged photographer

A few years ago, U.K. wildlife photographer William Burrard-Lucas started building a series of remote controlled DSLR camera vehicles as a DIY project. Named the BeetleCam, it’s now better protected, has space for a GoPro, and is a commercially available product.

Continuing to improve on his ideas and invent new ways to observe wildlife, Burrard-Lucas developed a gyro-stabilized BeetleBot and a BeetleCopter, which filmed the above scenes in the Serengeti, though they’re working on a quieter version. (A note for sensitive kiddos: half of a fresh kill shown at 2m14s.)

Below, a project update that shows all of his camtraptions.”

And look! Lion cubs stealing camerasHere’s one of the early teaser videos for an early version of the BeetleCam: 

In the archives: more Africa and so much nature.

via spectrum.ieee.org.

Swiss photographer Fabian Oefner works with the intersection of art and science. He takes perfectly-timed photos of brightly-colored paint being spun at high speeds. From the artist: 

"Black Hole" is a series of images, which shows paint modeled by the centripetal force. The setup is very simple: Various shades of acrylic paint are dripped onto a metallic rod, which is connected to a drill. When switched on, the paint starts to move away from the rod, creating these amazing looking structures.

The motion of the paint happens in a blink of an eye, the images you see are taken only millisecond after the drill was turned on. To capture the moment, where the paint forms that distinctive shape, I connected a sensor to the drill, which sends an impulse to the flashes. These specialized units are capable of creating flashes as short as a 1/40000 of a second, freezing the motion of the paint.

We’d love to watch high speed, slow-mo video of this project. See more of Fabian’s images here, and then check out his painting in magnetic ferrofluid project.

via Colossal.

This short, silent video shares a few behind-the-scenes moments from the ”fish tornado” photograph, titled David and Goliath, taken in Cabo Pulmo, Baja California Sur, Mexico by photographer Octavio Aburto

image

"As people have seen this image, I have been getting a lot of messages in my inbox and phone calls asking me “is this photo real?”  And “how did you congregate all these fish in one place to take the photo?”

"My response to these questions has been this — of course it is real. Fish, as is the case with many other animals, have certain behaviors that they perform when they reproduce. For example, when monarch butterflies mate they travel hundreds of thousands of kilometers, crossing from Canada down through Mexico to form unbelievable congregations. Sea turtles also have unique reproduction behavior —some travel the entire Pacific just to return to the beaches where they originally hatched. Birds fly hundreds of kilometers to certain areas to nest as well. These behaviors are well known within terrestrial animals and within the scientific community we have also known of these behaviors with fish and other marine creatures for many years. In Cabo Pulmo for example, blacktip reef sharks and mobula rays also congregate in large numbers to mate during the winter season.

"Even after I explain this unique behavior and the spectacular spawning aggregations of fish that occur naturally, some people don’t believe this image is real.

"In some ways I think this photo, and others like it, force people to think about the environment and more specifically in this case the ocean, dwindling fish populations the health of marine ecosystems worldwide and our role in it all."

via EarthSky.org.

With a cameo by Forest Scientist Stephen Sillett, watch this behind the scenes video about photographing the world’s second-largest known tree, 3,000+ year old President, in Sequoia National Park.

The resulting image, made from 126 images by photographer Michael “Nick” Nichols, is featured in National Geographic's December 2012 issue.

Elderly people with Alzheimer’s Disease or dementia sometimes forget to use the manual brakes on their wheelchairs, which then fall out from under them when they try to stand or sit. When this was brought to the attention of crop farmer Jerry Ford, he decided to do something about it. His invention is a rather clever automatic brake system for manual wheelchairs. It’s even designed in a way that still allows the wheelchair to fold up for transport.

This portrait is just one from a series of videos and photographs about inventors by photographer David Friedman.