photos

Showing 18 posts tagged photos

Jeremy Meek walks across the Brooklyn Bridge, taking one photo for every step or so. Step, snap, step, snap, step, snap. The Manhattan skyline grows larger in front of him, and people stroll, jog, and ride by as he documents his way across the East River in just over an hour and a half. Walking Across the Brooklyn Bridge in 1,177 PhotosSong: "Lovers’ Carvings" by Bibio, currently free on Amazon.)

Related videos: Joey Ramone - New York Cityanother quiet ode to the Brooklyn Bridge, and flip books.

via Laughing Squid.

If you’ve seen how underwater time-lapse can show the secret life of a coral reef on this site, then you already know that brilliantly fluorescing corals and sponges have fascinating, unseen experiences. But you’ve never seen “slow” marine animals like this: Slow Life by University of Queensland PhD student Daniel Stoupin.

To make this little clip I took 150000 shots. Why so many? Because macro photography involves shallow depth of field. To extend it, I used focus stacking. Each frame of the video is actually a stack that consists of 3-12 shots where in-focus areas are merged. Just the intro and last scene are regular real-time footage. One frame required about 10 minutes of processing time (raw conversion + stacking). Unfortunately, the success rate was very low due to copious technical challenges and I spent almost 9 long months just to learn how to make these kinds of videos and understand how to work with these delicate creatures.

Make sure that you watch this full-screen, HD actual size. The detail is incredible.

In the archives: more coral and time lapse.

via Kottke. Thanks, @cmykadam.

A few years ago, U.K. wildlife photographer William Burrard-Lucas started building a series of remote controlled DSLR camera vehicles as a DIY project. Named the BeetleCam, it’s now better protected, has space for a GoPro, and is a commercially available product.

Continuing to improve on his ideas and invent new ways to observe wildlife, Burrard-Lucas developed a gyro-stabilized BeetleBot and a BeetleCopter, which filmed the above scenes in the Serengeti, though they’re working on a quieter version. (A note for sensitive kiddos: half of a fresh kill shown at 2m14s.)

Below, a project update that shows all of his camtraptions.”

And look! Lion cubs stealing camerasHere’s one of the early teaser videos for an early version of the BeetleCam: 

In the archives: more Africa and so much nature.

via spectrum.ieee.org.

Watch a butterfly drink turtle tears from a Yellow-spotted Amazon River Turtle (Podocnemis unifilis). Wait, what?

It’s true: butterflies and bees will drink turtle tears as a source of sodium and minerals. In turn, the turtles get their eyes cleaned. The video above was filmed in Peru by Ryan M. Bolton, photographer/videographer and trained conservation biologist. Farther below, there’s a photo in Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park by conservation photographer Pete Oxford. Via LiveScience

Turtle tears are not the only source of such salts for butterflies; the insects also readily get the salt from animal urine, muddy river banks, puddles, sweaty clothes and sweating people, said Geoff Gallice, a graduate student of entomology at the Florida Museum of Natural History, who has witnessed butterflies flocking to turtle tears in the western Amazon rain forest.

This region is lower in sodium than many places on Earth, because it is more than 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) from the Atlantic Ocean, a prime source of salt, and is cut off from windblown mineral particles to the west by the Andes Mountains. Dust and minerals make their way into the Amazon from the east, sometimes all the way from north Africa. But much of this material is removed from the air by rain before it reaches the western Amazon, Torres said.


Related viewing: bees drinking turtle tears, and more amazing nature in the archives.

h/t Scinerds.