Topic: physics

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Slow motion lightning over South Dakota at 2,000 fps

From ZT Research's Tom A. Warner, watch this high speed video of lightning, filmed during a storm over South Dakota: My daughter got some nice high-speed camera captures of lightning while I drove. We chased a s...

Surprising Applications of the Magnus Effect – Veritasium

When you drop a basketball from a great height, in this case, 415 feet (126.5 m) off of Tasmania's Gordon Dam, the basketball will generally fall down into the area below where it was dropped. But what happens when yo...

Explore the Science Behind Fireworks—and the Galaxy

When you watch fireworks burst with color, you're seeing examples of how stars and galaxies work: Blues from copper, yellows from sodium, bright whites from aluminum, barium greens, and reds made from strontium... The...

A racquet flattens a tennis ball at 142 mph in slow motion

When a tennis player serves a tennis ball, the serve can reach speeds over 124 mph (200 km/h). But what's happening to the ball when it gets hit? This 142 mph (228.5 km/h) serve in slow motion (6,000fps) shows us. ...

Apotheosis – Northern Lights over Icelandic landscapes

From filmmaker Henry Jun Wah Lee, this is Apotheosis, a Northern Lights time lapse film featuring the landscapes of Iceland. Available in 4k, watch full screen. Via The Creator's Project: In 2015, the Earth is in ...

Resonance, forced vibration, and a tuning forks demo

A U-shaped fork of steel first invented in 1711 by trumpet player John Shore, the tuning fork is a tool produces a specific note that helps musicians keep their instruments in tune. They also are a great conversation ...

Marble Tsunami marble run machine: 11,000 marbles

It's a Marble Tsunami! This huge marble run machine or knikkerbaan has more than 11,000 marbles rolling, sliding, zigzagging, hitting bells, and clacking endlessly into each other, making quite a cacophony. With four ...

Celebrating Sally Ride, the first American woman in space

On June 18th, 1983, NASA physicist Dr. Sally Ride became the first American woman astronaut to fly in space. Orbiting Earth on Space Shuttle Challenger, she inspired an entire generation to follow their interests in s...

This mini origami robot self-folds, performs tasks, & can be dissolved

Researchers from MIT and TU Munich have debuted an insect-like, miniature, self-assembling origami robot at ICRA 2015. The tiny bot is 1.7cm by 1.7cm and is made of a neodymium magnet, PVC, and polystyrene or paper. W...

DIY Cloud Chamber – How to build your own particle detector

There's an easy way to build a particle detector for around $40. Yes, you can make your own particle detector to see invisible cosmic rays from space. In this video from US LHC at CERN -- LHC stands for Large Hadr...

Red PaperBridge, a temporary installation by Steve Messam

A red paper foot bridge arcs across a small river in the Grisedale Valley in Cumbria. Accessible by a 2 mile walk from the town of Patterdale, it sits in nature as a bright tribute to its natural surroundings, as well...

A solid, liquid, & gas at the same time – The Triple Point

How can a chemical be a solid, a liquid, and a gas at the same time? In the video above, a clear liquid called cyclohexane is experiencing the perfect pressure and temperature combination for its solid, liquid, and ga...

What’s the Loudest Possible Sound? – It’s Okay to Be Smart

"What is the loudest possible sound? What about the quietest thing we can hear? And what do decibels measure, anyway?" This video from Joe Hanson and It's Okay to Be Smart dives into the wide ranging and incredibly se...

Odyssey: A universe of ink, oil, soap, and glitter in macro detail

Made with a mix of ink, oil, soap, and glitter, art director Ruslan Khasanov has filmed a sparkling experimental video that explores how the fluids interact with each other in macro detail. This is Odyssey. ...

Demo of the FloWave Ocean Simulator & the AMOEBA wave pool

Filmed by The School of Physics & Astronomy at the University of Edinburgh, this is the FloWave Ocean Simulator, a 2.4 million liter (634,013 gallon) controllable research pool for testing devices and prototypes in wa...

The science of static electricity – TED Ed

What is static electricity? Why do we get a tiny spark when we've walked across a carpet and touched a doorknob? Or have you ever pet a cat and then picked up something metal, like a spoon to stir up cat food? Zap! (A...

The art of suminagashi or Japanese paper marbling

Watch artisan Tadao Fukuda as he creates beautiful handmade marbled papers, an art called suminagashi (墨流し) in Japanese. From echizenwashi.jp: Mr.Fukuda is in his eighties and very energetic to have had his marb...

Stanford’s MicroTug robot can pull 2,000x its weight on glass

Inspired by the incredible sticking power in ant feet and gecko toes, researchers at Stanford's Biomimetics and Dextrous Manipulation Lab have developed directional adhesives that help this 12-gram µTug (MicroTug) rob...

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