physics

Showing 197 posts tagged physics

Watch as pen spinners Ian Jenson and 吳宗諺 (PPM) perform some epic pen spinning, complete with a few great slow motion moments that really showcase what’s going on. This short from Taiwan’s Kuma Films makes us want to get some weighted spinning pens, but anyone can start practicing with an everyday pencil, too: How to Spin a Pencil Around Your Thumb.

Update via LaughingSquid: “PPM is currently competing in the video-based Pen Spinning World Cup 2014, in which he is a semi-finalist.”

In the archives: spinningtricks, and practice.

What Does Sound Look Like? NPR’s SkunkBear shows us the differences in fluid densities — in the form of compression waves in a gas, the air that surrounds us — thanks to the light passing through those fluids. Schlieren flow visualization and a high speed video camera make it possible. 

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.

Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound. 

More seriously amazing physics videos the archives: underwater bubble rings, a fluidized bed of sand, and huge wingtip vortices.

Festo HQ, the engineering team that brought us Aqua Penguins, Aqua Jellyfishdragonfly-inspired BionicOpters, and a robot that flies like a bird can now add Bionic Kangaroo to their list of animal-inspired achievements in technology. From spectrum.ieee.org

BionicKangaroo is able to realistically emulate the jumping behavior of real kangaroos, which means that it can efficiently recover energy from one jump to help it make another jump. Without this capability, kangaroos (real ones) would get very very tired very very quickly, but by using their tendons like elastic springs, the animals can bound at high speeds efficiently for substantial periods of time.

BionicKangaroo emulates this with an actual elastic spring, which partially “charges” the legs on landing.

Bonus fun: wear the corresponding armband and you can control the kangaroo using gestures. Mmmmmmm, biomechanics.

via Gizmodo.

That moment that ketchup transitions from a solid, high up in the ketchup bottle, to a liquid that squirts all over your fries – that moment is a big physics moment. Why? Ketchup is a non-Newtonian fluid (like oobleck, peanut butter, custard, toothpaste, paint, blood, or quicksand) that can switch between a solid and liquid state, and ketchup is non-Newtonian in two different ways…

In that transition moment, ketchup may be responding to a strong, quick force, suddenly making it thinner, or if you’re patient and apply just a wee bit of force, it may start flowing given some time and gravity. Grab a ketchup bottle and get the details in this TED Ed lesson by George Zaidan, with animation by TOGETHER.

Related watching: oobleck, TED Ed, the incredible physics of ants, and more about that sugar in your ketchup.

What does it look like when a car splashes a huge wave of water out of a puddle in slow motion? We’re about to find out: Slow Mo Guys Gav and Dan got together with race car driver Ken Gushi, a car, and a massive puddle of water to film a Huge Puddle Splash at 2500fps. And no, they didn’t wait for a warm day to do it.

In the archives, more car videos, more slow motion, and more Slow Mo Guys: How a Slinky falls.