Topic: physics

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DIY Cloud Chamber – How to build your own particle detector

There's an easy way to build a particle detector for around $40. Yes, you can make your own particle detector to see invisible cosmic rays from space. In this video from US LHC at CERN -- LHC stands for Large Hadr...

Red PaperBridge, a temporary installation by Steve Messam

A red paper foot bridge arcs across a small river in the Grisedale Valley in Cumbria. Accessible by a 2 mile walk from the town of Patterdale, it sits in nature as a bright tribute to its natural surroundings, as well...

A solid, liquid, & gas at the same time – The Triple Point

How can a chemical be a solid, a liquid, and a gas at the same time? In the video above, a clear liquid called cyclohexane is experiencing the perfect pressure and temperature combination for its solid, liquid, and ga...

What’s the Loudest Possible Sound? – It’s Okay to Be Smart

"What is the loudest possible sound? What about the quietest thing we can hear? And what do decibels measure, anyway?" This video from Joe Hanson and It's Okay to Be Smart dives into the wide ranging and incredibly se...

Odyssey: A universe of ink, oil, soap, and glitter in macro detail

Made with a mix of ink, oil, soap, and glitter, art director Ruslan Khasanov has filmed a sparkling experimental video that explores how the fluids interact with each other in macro detail. This is Odyssey. ...

Demo of the FloWave Ocean Simulator & the AMOEBA wave pool

Filmed by The School of Physics & Astronomy at the University of Edinburgh, this is the FloWave Ocean Simulator, a 2.4 million liter (634,013 gallon) controllable research pool for testing devices and prototypes in wa...

The science of static electricity – TED Ed

What is static electricity? Why do we get a tiny spark when we've walked across a carpet and touched a doorknob? Or have you ever pet a cat and then picked up something metal, like a spoon to stir up cat food? Zap! (A...

The art of suminagashi or Japanese paper marbling

Watch artisan Tadao Fukuda as he creates beautiful handmade marbled papers, an art called suminagashi (墨流し) in Japanese. From echizenwashi.jp: Mr.Fukuda is in his eighties and very energetic to have had his marb...

Stanford’s MicroTug robot can pull 2,000x its weight on glass

Inspired by the incredible sticking power in ant feet and gecko toes, researchers at Stanford's Biomimetics and Dextrous Manipulation Lab have developed directional adhesives that help this 12-gram µTug (MicroTug) rob...

Emperor Penguins Speed Launch Out of the Water

We've seen a video of penguins rocketing out of the water as if powered by jets, but we've never seen it happen from underwater... until now. In this National Geographic clip, photographer Paul Nicklen captures how th...

Physics Girl: Seven surface tension experiments

This Physics Girl video highlights seven different surface tension experiments that you can easily try at home or in the classroom. Have any of these around? A plate, a glass, a penny, an index card, a paperclip, an e...

Guinness World Record – The largest popsicle stick chain reaction

According to Austrian Domino Art, the Tulln Domino Team of Austria set a Guinness World Record on March 30, 2015 for the largest stick bomb, also known as a popsicle stick chain reaction. The total: 30,849 sticks in ...

A waterless & chemical-free sound wave fire extinguisher

Using low-frequency sound waves to put out flames, this experimental fire extinguisher is the work of George Mason University engineering seniors Viet Tran and Seth Robertson. Watch as they Pump Up the Bass to Douse a...

Slime Cannon Attack – How Velvet Worm slime jets work

Giant velvet worms (Peripatus solorzanoi) are unusual creatures for many reasons -- including the fact that they are "not worms, not insects, millipedes, centipedes, or slugs" -- but their super-sliming glands, rapidl...

Stanford researchers solve the mystery of the dancing droplets

This beautifully-made video about a beautifully-colored series of experiments from a Stanford research team showcases how a observing a few droplets of food coloring -- made of water and propylene glycol -- have led t...

The Slow Mo Guys: CD shattering at 170,000 frames per second

In this slowest episode of The Slow Mo Guys ever, Gav and Dan spin a CD at 23,000 revolutions per minute (rpm), causing it to shatter rather spectacularly. The results were filmed with a Phantom V2511 at 28,500 frames...

ScienceTake: The Praying Mantis Leaps

In this ScienceTake from The New York Times, we watch a young praying mantis leap over and over and over again... a completely fascinating, rather cartoon-like action that can be super-useful for scientists and engin...

Veritasium: How (and Why) Do Chameleons Change Color?

There is a misconception about chameleons... that they change their color in order to blend in with their environment. That is actually not the case... So why do chameleons change color and how are they doing it? ...

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