Topic: physics

Sort: Date | Title | Sort Ascending
View:

ScienceTake: The Praying Mantis Leaps

In this ScienceTake from The New York Times, we watch a young praying mantis leap over and over and over again... a completely fascinating, rather cartoon-like action that can be super-useful for scientists and engin...

Veritasium: How (and Why) Do Chameleons Change Color?

There is a misconception about chameleons... that they change their color in order to blend in with their environment. That is actually not the case... So why do chameleons change color and how are they doing it? ...

ExpeRimental: How to make fizzy bottle rockets

This ExpeRimental episode from The Royal Institution is full of super explosive fun. Danielle and Michael show a group of kids how to make fizzy bottle rockets with some small, sports-capped plastic bottles, some Alka...

Tops (1969) by Charles and Ray Eames

Charles Eames was quoted to have said, "Toys are not really as innocent as they look. Toys and games are the preludes to serious ideas." He and his wife Ray, both iconic designers, seemed to take this play-based appro...

How to make smoke rings with a simple DIY vortex cannon

If you're looking to make a simple vortex canon for shooting smoke rings across the room, you'll like this DIY video by Dave Hax. All you'll need is an empty plastic bottle, a balloon, and an incense stick, preferably...

ExpeRimental: The Soap Boat Water Experiment

Send molecules flying with this super fun and easy science experiment for kids (and adults): The Soap Boat Water Experiment from The Royal Institution's ExpeRimental series. Comedian Rufus Hound and his son Alby make ...

How is an ice sculpture made? SciFri investigates frozen water

What's So Cool About Frozen Water? Art and science come together to uncover some ice-expert-level details in this 2012 Science Friday report. Shintaro Okamoto, founder of NYC's Okamoto Studio, and Erland Schulson, Dar...

ExpeRimental: Candle Chemistry

In this episode of ExpeRimental, Lisa and Josh explain the unseen as they make a flame jump through the air. Josh also measures how long it takes for covered candles to extinguish on their own. There's more activity i...

The Physics of Popcorn: Why Popcorn Also Jumps

What happens when a popcorn kernel pops? Heat! Pressure! The hull splits. Water vapor escapes. POP. And then there's a somersault that sends it flying in the air! But how? Watch as ScienceTake explains in detail: ...

Physics Girl: The Stacked Ball Drop (and Supernovas)

How is a supernova like a basketball, a bouncy ball, and a golf ball all stacked together? It's all in what happens when you drop them. In this video, Physics Girl Dianna Cowern demonstrates the momentum transfer betw...

Dara Ó Briain’s Science Club: Breaking a glass with sound

From Dara Ó Briain’s Science Club, watch as Professor Mark Miodownik finds the resonant frequency of a wine glass, as indicated by the small vibrating slip of paper balancing on the edge. When he cranks up the volume,...

The Electric Sausage: A static electricity demonstration

Perhaps you've experimented with static electricity by using a balloon, paper clippings, your hair, a pencil, a plastic bag, or a Van de Graaff Generator... but have you ever used a sausage to see static electricity i...

Hydrophobic metal made with laser-etched microscopic patterns

Scientists from the University of Rochester have created water-repelling metal by laser-etching nanostructures into the surface. Watch as water droplets bounce like water balloons off of the metal's super-hydrophobic ...

What makes that fresh rain smell? MIT films rain drops to find out

Why do we smell that fresh earthy scent before and/or after it rains? With high-speed cameras, MIT researchers have filmed rain drops, and believe that the footage explains petrichor, the "pleasant smell that frequent...

How Small Is An Atom?

Using a strand of hair, your fist, rice and sand grains, as well as the room you're sitting in right now (assuming it's not a huge gymnasium), let's try to visualize the basic building block of everything around us: A...

The Ring of Truth: Two Hydrogen Atoms & One Oxygen Atom

Possibly the most well-known scientific formula on the planet, H2O is one of those terms that we see around all the time. We know that H2O means water, and that a water molecule is composed of two hydrogen (H) atoms &...

Deep Look: The Fantastic Fur of Sea Otters

Sea otters are creatures who live in water that's far too cold for their bodies. There are other animals, like whales and sea lions, that are insulated from the cold by blubber, a layer of fat under their skin, but as...

Cambridge Ideas: The Sticky Feet of Ants & Cockroaches

Have you ever watched an ant walk up a wall? Have you seen one upside down on a ledge while carrying something? How do insect feet stick like that?! Get a very close look at the minuscule foot anatomy of ants and cock...