physics

Showing 197 posts tagged physics

Gravitational acceleration + optical illusions + how to! In this Get Set… Demonstrate, science teacher Alom Shaha shows step by step how to create Pearls of Water, a physics-defying demonstration that must look even more unbelievable in person than it does on video.

And if you want to see this in person, the instructions, equipment list, and safety notes for setting it up are here (pdf).

Want to see similar versions of this illusion? Check out artist Matt Kenyon’s Supermajor and Brusspup’s Amazing Water and Sound Experiment.

via Science Demo.

Bending on almost-invisible hinges, Ghostcube is a system of wooden cubes that can create different structures depending on how they’re twisted and rearranged. They’re made by Stockholm-based artist Erik Åberg.

If you’ve seen Brusspup’s Amazing Moving Cube tutorial, then you’ll have an idea about how Ghostcube may have been constructed, and how you can DIY something similar. Get started!

via Viral Viral Videos.

The timelapsed formation of snowflakes in macrofocus by Vyacheslav Ivanov. Music: Aphex Twin - Avril 14th.

Update via Colossal: “Ivanov confirms from his home in St. Petersburg that the video is indeed genuine (non digital) and was filmed through a microscope with a ‘lot of effort and patience.’”

Read more about the science behind the snowflake’s formation at io9.

Related watching: Snow Facts Cheat Sheetice crystals form on a soap bubblejazz and tiny hailstones, and instant ice crystals.

via Kuriositas.

Which tire will roll down the ski jump fastest and jump the farthest? A Formula One tire? An enormous bulldozer tire? The smallest tire? This clip from Japanese television has made the rounds in years past, but the video source disappeared. We watched it again when it reappeared on Metafilter. Gotta love the lab coats, white gloves, and the surprising last jump.

So which of these six tires would you guess makes the biggest jump? And why?

In the archives, more physics of falling and jumping: domino chain reaction, 2,000 ping pong balls and 30 teachers in zero-g, a cat landing on its feet, and the jumping sand flea robot.