Topic: plants

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Helen Ahpornsiri’s intricate pressed fern illustrations

Assembled with patience, imagination, and a steady hand, Helen Ahpornsiri creates intricate pressed fern illustrations of honey bees, pheasants, magpies, spiny seahorses, weevils, moths, Totoros, and other creatures. ...

Crash Course Kids: Gotta Eat! and Feed Me: Classifying Organisms

Why do we eat and how does what we eat help classify what we are? In these first two episodes from Crash Course Kids, Sabrina explains why all living things eat. Also, try the simple energy source experiment in episod...

NASA: Satellite Tracks Saharan Dust to Amazon in 3-D

Watch 182 million tons of dust ride the wind out of Africa's Sahara Desert in 3D, as tracked from 2007 through 2013 by lidar, thanks to CALIPSO, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation sa...

Why do carrots taste sweeter in the winter?

From the University of California’s Fig.1 series, Molecular Biologist Liz Roth-Johnson explains why cold weather makes carrots taste more sweet: Because plants are immobile, they must develop defense techniques aga...

Help your local honey bees: Plant a bee-friendly garden

Pollinators like the honey bee are a huge part of how our food grows, but recently, honey bee populations have been in decline due to what scientists believe might be a mix of pesticide and fungicide use, pathogens, p...

How Does It Grow? Apples

Before watching this video, we thought that planting a Gala apple seed would grow a Gala apple tree that would produce Gala apples. Perhaps not! In this episode of How Does It Grow?, we get to see the rather surprisin...

Bioluminescent forest: Nature reimagined with projection mapping

How might you imagine small forest creatures and plants looking if they were bioluminescent? Which animals and plants would you pick to glow, and what patterns and colors would you design for them? Artists Friedri...

Deep Look: The Hidden Perils of Permafrost

When you put a permafrost core in a CT scanner and analyze the data, you're traveling back in time to answer important questions: What was buried deep within the frozen soil? How much of it is ice or plant matter? How...

Dead stuff: The secret ingredient in our food chain

When you picture the lowest levels of the food chain, you might imagine herbivores happily munching on lush, living green plants. But this idyllic image leaves out a huge (and slightly less appetizing) source of nouri...

Deep Look: The Crazy Cribs of Parasitic Wasps

These tiny wasps have a wonderful trick: they prompt oak trees to grow galls, abnormal plant tissue structures that shelter wasp eggs, by injecting a chemical under the tree's skin. If that was the end of the story...

Cranberries: How Does It Grow?

Cranberries might have one of the more spectacular-looking harvests of any food. Every October, cranberry bogs full of low-growing, fruit-bearing, woody vines are flooded with water. As harvesters drive through, the m...

What’s inside the stomach of a carnivorous Pitcher Plant?

Luring insects into its pools of digestive juices, then dissolving the bugs into "amino acids, peptides, phosphates, ammonium and urea, from which the plant obtains its mineral nutrition," the Pitcher Plant is famousl...

Breakfast with a Cassowary

What's it like to live in a tropical rainforest? In this Wild Diaries travel video, Sue Gregory explains her connection with the native wildlife and the boundless plant growth that envelops Cassowary House, her family...

Cauliflower: How Does it Grow?

Five million heads of cauliflower grow every year at Lakeside Organic Gardens, a family-owned farm in Watsonville, California. These flower bunches are full of vitamin C, fiber, and antioxidants... and they change fro...

Feedback loops: How nature gets its rhythms

A grasshopper eats grass, a rat can eat the grasshopper, a snake may eat the rat, and a hawk will eat the snake. When these food chains interweave, they create a food web. Plants and animals (including humans) live, e...

Sci Code: There’s no such thing as vegetables

Botanically-speaking, the "veggies" that we're eating are way more interesting and diverse than we usually give them credit for. A carrot is a root, broccoli is a flower, spinach is a leaf, asparagus are stems, potato...

Sixteen year old Elif Bilgin turned banana peels into a bioplastic

After two years of research, experiments, and failed trials, 16-year-old Elif Bilgin developed a new process for turning banana peels into a non-decaying bioplastic, a more eco-friendly alternative to petroleum-based ...

Garlic: How Does it Grow?

With a history of human use going back 7,000 years, garlic is a culinary and medicinal mainstay in Asian, European, African, Latin American and North American cultures, and yet many don't know a lot about this pungent...

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