power

Showing 9 posts tagged power

Generate your own electricity with some wire, a magnetic field, and the relative movement between the two of them: Alom Shaha explains electromagnetic induction using this hand-powered – or perhaps more accurately, bacon-sandwich-powered – generator.

Related watching: magnetic fields, probably one of the more awe-inducing subjects on this blog.

via Science Demo.

How can the physics and engineering of wind and water change a country? From the world of European travel guides, here’s a quick primer: The Netherlands: Working Windmills.

300 years ago, half of what we know as The Netherlands was under water. Slowly, the former seabed was reclaimed and the Dutch went to work drying the ground with the country’s leading natural resource - the wind. Over 1000 windmills, some still functioning, survive in the Netherlands today, reminding locals and tourists alike of the clever engine that powered the creation of this land. 

Related reading: Archimedes’ screw. Related watching: how wind turbines workwingtip vortices, Windswept, The Old Mill, and more amazing videos about The Netherlands.

With three wheels, pneumatic motors, and driven by a joystick, this ladybug of a car is compelling for both its unusual form and its power source: compressed air. The AIRPod was developed as a sustainable, zero-emission solution for urban commuting, airport vehicles, messenger services, and more. Initially conceived of in 1991 and promised for production since 2000, the car is finally expected to be on sale for around 7,000 euros sometime in 2014. Via Core77:

One tank lasts over 125 miles (200 km) and takes only two minutes to fill up again at an average price of just one euro per fill.

Bonus: the eco-friendly engine technology can be built into boats, backup generators, farm machines, and more.

In the archives, more cars and more sustainability videos, including these two jaw-dropping favorites: an air-powered LEGO carbehind-the-scenes at the Tesla factory and the Moser Lamp.

Updated video link.

This is what 20-year-old Romanian Raul Oaida (above) and Melbourne entrepreneur Steve Sammartino did with more than 500,000 LEGO pieces and four orbital enginesThe Super Awesome Micro Project — a full sized LEGO car with an air-powered engine, and 256 pistons that also appear to be made from LEGO. It goes around 20mph and they don’t go much faster than that because they really don’t want to crash it.

More LEGO videos, including this awesome DIY project: build your own LEGO microscope.

via Devour.

We love this made-for-kids series of videos, Circuit Playgroundby MIT engineer and Adafruit Founder Limor Fried (in the pink hair) and her robot friend ADABOT. For this excellent DIY project — and to find out what’s going on inside of the batteries that you use — get some lemons, pennies, galvanized nails, some aligator clips, and an LED, then watch their second video in the series, B is for Battery.

And if you missed it, watch A is for Ampere.