prehistoric

Showing 3 posts tagged prehistoric

The question “Who was the first human?” was a very popular one in our house just last year, but the evolution videos we had in the archives – even the awesome Five Fingers of Evolution TED Ed video – didn’t answer it directly enough for my kids. This visual-filled video timeline from Joe Hanson of It’s Okay to Be Smart does: There was no first human.

You can never pinpoint the exact moment that a species came to be, because it never did. Just like how you used to be a baby and now you’re older, but there was no single day when you went to bed young and woke up old…

There was no first human. It sounds like a paradox, it sounds like it breaks the whole theory of evolution, but it’s really a key to truly understanding how evolution works. 

Also, your grandparents (a hundred eight-five million generations removed) were fish!

In the archives, more videos about evolution, Neil deGrasse Tyson explains evolution, and a related must-watch video about our human history: Carl Sagan’s Cosmic Calendar from the original Cosmos.

From jtotheizzoe.

"The human story is really nothing short of the story of a little corner of the universe becoming aware of itself." From National Geographic, paleo-artist John Gurche creates realistic human likenesses of our ancient ancestors. You can see them almost come to life at the Smithsonian’s Hall of Human Origins.

In the archives: more history, more humanity, and more evolution.

An almost-complete skeleton of a Mammoth has been found in an ancient Roman excavation site about 19 miles outside of Paris. It’s thought to be between 100,000 to 200,000 years old. 

"Evidence this clear has never been found before, at least in France," said Gregory Bayle, chief archaeologist at the site.

"We’re working on the theory that Neanderthal men came across the carcass and cut off bits of meat."

Above, a clip of what Woolly Mammoth life might have been like, from the BBC natural history show Wild New World. Below, scientists dive further into what traits the Mammoth had to adapt to the freezing cold temperatures of the Ice Age: