reptile

Showing 3 posts tagged reptile

Check out this bright green and blue Four-Toed Whiptail Lizard, Teius Teyou, a common animal in the grassy sands of Paraguay, South America. Biologist Dr Jonny Miller introduces the reptile, named for the four long, spindly toes on its back feet.

Only Superman himself could chase and catch one of these lizards - the one I’m holding in the video had fallen into a bucket trap from which I retrieved it. Bucket traps are designed for exactly that purpose - for animals to fall into! Biologists and conservationists use them to discover what species of small animal, particularly reptiles and amphibians, small mammals and large insects, are living in the area. The traps are checked regularly, a note of any visitors is made, and the bucket guests are then released as quickly as possible into the habitat.

Dr. Miller is currently in Paraguay studying capuchin monkeys and has been blogging about the animals there at planetparaguay.com.

In the archives with Dr. Miller: the Common Potoo and the aforementioned Red-Tailed Vanzosaur.

If you’re a chameleon, camouflage isn’t always what you want to do with your color-changing abilities. Sometimes you want to stand out and look as bright and as threatening as possible, specifically in a fight with another chameleon. But where you are bright matters.

Behavioral ecologist Russell Ligon and his colleague Kevin McGraw captured skirmishes between 10 male veiled chameleons on a high-speed camera and found that their colors can predict who will win the fight. From New Scientist

They found that males with the brightest side stripes were more likely to instigate a fight, whereas those with brighter heads that changed colour most rapidly were more likely to win. This suggests that different colours and patterns may signal different aspects of competitive behaviour – how motivated the chameleon is versus its strength.

Read more about chameleon color communication research at National Geographic: Chameleons Convey Different Info With Different Body Parts.

Related watching: camouflage videos like the glass frog, leaf-tailed geckos, and the common potoo, and, of course, chameleons!

Watch a butterfly drink turtle tears from a Yellow-spotted Amazon River Turtle (Podocnemis unifilis). Wait, what?

It’s true: butterflies and bees will drink turtle tears as a source of sodium and minerals. In turn, the turtles get their eyes cleaned. The video above was filmed in Peru by Ryan M. Bolton, photographer/videographer and trained conservation biologist. Farther below, there’s a photo in Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park by conservation photographer Pete Oxford. Via LiveScience

Turtle tears are not the only source of such salts for butterflies; the insects also readily get the salt from animal urine, muddy river banks, puddles, sweaty clothes and sweating people, said Geoff Gallice, a graduate student of entomology at the Florida Museum of Natural History, who has witnessed butterflies flocking to turtle tears in the western Amazon rain forest.

This region is lower in sodium than many places on Earth, because it is more than 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) from the Atlantic Ocean, a prime source of salt, and is cut off from windblown mineral particles to the west by the Andes Mountains. Dust and minerals make their way into the Amazon from the east, sometimes all the way from north Africa. But much of this material is removed from the air by rain before it reaches the western Amazon, Torres said.


Related viewing: bees drinking turtle tears, and more amazing nature in the archives.

h/t Scinerds.