Topic: research

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AMNH: Shelf Life – Turtles and Taxonomy

The science of classification, specifically the biological taxonomy of organisms, organizes how humans see and study the life that surrounds us. For museum-goers, observing a turtle skull, seaweed leaves, or a cabinet...

Science Take: The Hidden Complexities of the Simple Match

Schlieren flow visualizations illuminate a world of activity that we almost never pay attention to, even when we're causing it to happen. Simple things like breathing, sneezing, clapping hands, or just producing heat ...

Deep Look: The Hidden Perils of Permafrost

When you put a permafrost core in a CT scanner and analyze the data, you're traveling back in time to answer important questions: What was buried deep within the frozen soil? How much of it is ice or plant matter? How...

More Evidence Birds Can Count: Where’d that other mealworm go?

Researchers are eagerly tricking wild New Zealand robins, but it's FOR SCIENCE! Watch as this box with a sliding trick drawer helps Alexis Garland and Jason Low at Victoria University of Wellington observe the behavio...

AMNH: Shelf Life – 33 Million Things

What if you could open up a drawer full of hundreds of pinned insect specimens to study them under a microscope, or unscrew the jar cap to scan a curious creature that swam in the deep sea decades ago? For collectors ...

ScienceTake: A Surprising Appetite for Dead Jellyfish

Marine scientists previously suspected that dead jellyfish were not a preferred choice of food for ocean floor scavengers, but a recently-recorded test using Helmet and Lion’s Mane jellyfish has prompted a rethinking ...

ScienceTake: The secrets of a sidewinder snake on a sandy slope

If you've ever run up a sandy hill, you know it can be tough to get up it quickly -- each foot sinking and sliding as you climb upward. Sidewinder snakes, however, can slither up hills rather efficiently, even in comp...

To the Scientists of the Future: Materials science with EUPHRATES

Created by EUPHRATES and Masahiko Sato for Japan's National Institute for Material Science (NIMS), these three "To the Scientists of the Future" short films are a mesmerizing combination of materials research innovati...

Shake Your Silk-Maker: The Dance of the Peacock Spider

When a peacock spider dances, how do we know that it's a really, really good dancer? From their colorful, iridescent body displays, to their wide variety of dance moves, to the different rhythms that they "sing" while...

MIT’s electric cheetah-bot runs offleash

Quiet, efficient, and powerful: MIT's robotic cheetah has a "custom-designed, high-torque-density" electric motor, and can run and jump around without being tethered to an external power source. It's also looking ...

Self-Folding Crawler: A Transformer-style Origami Robot

From flat-packed to self-folding, Harvard graduate student Samuel Felton was inspired by origami when he created a laser-cut robot that could assemble itself and autonomously scurry away. The basic ingredients: two mo...

Outfitting Tree Kangaroos with tiny video cameras

Tree kangaroos are elusive creatures that live high in the trees of New Guinea's tropical rainforests. To learn more about them and to better protect them, Dr. Lisa Dabek has worked with National Geographic and local ...

Understanding tether dynamics through kite flying

For Hilary Costello's ongoing Ph.D. research, she can be found inside at a computer, coding and writing equations, and outside flying kites in the wide open spaces of Cambridge University. Her goal: "design an aerodyn...

Paralyzed Woman Controls Robotic Arm With Thoughts

When Cathy Hutchinson controlled a robotic arm using a small sensor planted in her brain, it was a remarkable breakthrough in neurobiology and computer science. The sensor would recognize patterns or signals from her ...

Spiders Tune Their Webs Like A Guitar

Much more than just a net to catch prey, spider webs can transmit lots of information about what has been caught or what might be visiting. Oxford researchers have recently discovered that the strands of silk vibrate ...

The Fire Lab and the Mysterious Science of Fire

How does fire spread? How do different forest materials fuel it? How can firefighters better understand its behavior in order to control it? Why is the physics of fire so counter-intuitive and mysterious to us? At Th...

The beautiful physics and math of sneezes

If you don't cover your mouth when you sneeze, that sneeze and the germs within it are explosively set free into the surrounding area. But where do the droplets travel and how far can they reach? No one had done much ...

Lost at sea: Researching the impact of sunken shipping containers

Thousands of shipping containers are lost from cargo ships every year, eventually falling to the ocean floor and disturbing the deep-sea ecosystems where they land. In February 2004, a container was discovered within ...

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