Topic: research

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Why Dogs Have Floppy Ears, an animated tale

Why do some breeds of dogs have floppy ears? Charles Darwin asked this question in his 1868 book The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication. And it's not just the ears of dogs. The ears, snout lengths, fu...

Collecting some 350 fungi specimens in the Ecuadorian Andes

Of an estimated 3.2 million species of fungi, only some 120,000 are known to science. Most of the undescribed species reside in the tropics. In 2014, myself [Danny Newman] and a fellow mycologist, Roo Vandegrift, coll...

Carl Linnaeus’ Systema Naturae and Herbarium Cabinet

How did scientists and naturalists organize their artifact collections in the 1700s? How could these systems, long before we began to rely on computers to help us organize data, improve our understanding of the natura...

Becoming Visible: Shattering stereotypes & misconceptions in science

The University of Florida's Florida Museum of Natural History celebrated 100 years of inspiring people to care about life on Earth in 2017. To mark the closing of an era and the beginning of a new century, UF News pro...

How glow-in-the-dark jellyfish inspired a scientific revolution

In science, ideas are kind of like seeds. If you're lucky, a seed will grow and expand the boundaries of human knowledge. But it's hard to know which seeds will take root. Take any invention or modern innovation and i...

Why (and how) do whales sing?

Whale vocalizations are a bit of a mystery. We know that only the males of some baleen whales sing, but we're not sure what those compositions—specifically structured phrases and melodies that repeat and evolve within...

How the Animal Kingdom Sleeps & How Animals See the World – Animalism

Sleep is universal in the animal kingdom, but each species slumbers in a different — and often mysterious — way. Some animals snooze with half their brain, while others only sleep for two hours a day (without even suf...

Squid: Coming to Life, captured in microscopic detail

From a 'pearl' filled with dividing cells to hatchlings with color-shifting skin, watch as these very small cephalopods grow up under a microscope. The film, Squid: Coming to Life, was created by evolutionary and deve...

Do jellyfish sleep?

At first glance, humans seem to have very little in common with Cassiopea, a primitive jellyfish. Cassiopea is brainless, spineless, and spends essentially its entire life sitting upside down on the ocean floor, pulsa...

Secrets of Schooling: Investigating the collective behavior of fish

Collective behavior is embodied in swarms of insects, flocks of birds, herds of antelope, and schools of fish. In each of these cases, individuals move through their environment and respond to threats and opportunitie...

Why are museum collections so important? Sir David Attenborough explains

Museums like the American Museum of Natural History may, at first, seem to be sharing their entire scientific collections in the public displays of their grand halls, but when scientists need specimens for research, t...

Three quarters of deep-sea animals are bioluminescent

Thanks to advancing camera technology and diligent scientific research, scientists have learned that bioluminescence is not the unusual attribute that we thought it was. Researchers Séverine Martini and Steven H. D. H...

Can Mushrooms Save the Honey Bee? – bioGraphic

Honey bees, pollinators that contribute their skills to a third of our edible crops, have been suffering from a recent phenomenon called colony collapse disorder (CCD), possibly caused by a mix of pathogens, parasites...

Pharaoh cuttlefish expertly mimic hermit crabs

Camouflage is common in cephalopods like squid, octopuses, and cuttlefish, but these pharaoh cuttlefish, hatched in a lab for a University of Ryukyus study led by Kohei Okamoto, camouflage in a surprising way: They pr...

Chaser, the Border Collie that can understand 1022 words (or more)

Border Collies are known to be super smart and disciplined dogs that can take detailed verbal commands while herding sheep and performing other helpful tasks. How many verbal commands can they understand? This demonst...

A blue whale lunges for krill

How can the largest creatures on the planet survive by almost exclusively eating some of the smallest creatures in the sea? In this video from Oregon State University, we get a very rare look at how blue whales eat ti...

‘Giant’ larvaceans filter the ocean with mucous webs

Using remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and a new laser-and-camera system, researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) have been able to study three Bathochordaeus species, transparent and rela...

Drones help scientists study Guatemalan volcanoes

A team of volcanologists and engineers from the Universities of Cambridge and Bristol has collected measurements from directly within volcanic clouds, together with visual and thermal images of inaccessible volcano pe...

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