Topic: research

Sort: Date | Title | Sort Ascending
View:

The first 21 days of a bee’s life, a time lapse in 64 seconds

Honey bees are such an integral part of our ecosystem -- they pollenate 1/3 of our food crops -- yet we don't understand all that we should about their life cycle, or what has been threatening them in the last few yea...

ROV footage of deep sea creatures from the coast of Puerto Rico

Real-time science collaboration is much easier thanks to today's streaming video technology. During dives made by a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) off the coast of Puerto Rico, a team of National Oceanic and Atmosphe...

The Pygmy Sloths of Isla Escudo de Veraguas

These are pygmy sloths and they're only found in one place in the world: a Caribbean island called Escudo de Veraguas. Academy research fellow Bryson Voirin introduces this critically endangered species, and explains ...

ScienceTake: How the Octopus Moves

How do you move from here to there when you have eight long, flexible legs that radiate out from your head? After analyzing recordings of how an octopus moves, three Israeli researchers have determined something prett...

Slime Cannon Attack – How Velvet Worm slime jets work

Giant velvet worms (Peripatus solorzanoi) are unusual creatures for many reasons -- including the fact that they are "not worms, not insects, millipedes, centipedes, or slugs" -- but their super-sliming glands, rapidl...

PoSSUM Program Trains Scientists for Space Research

For those who want to be an astronaut or work in space, and for those climate scientists who want a closer look at the mesosphere -- the understudied layer of Earth's atmosphere that's above the stratosphere and below...

Stanford researchers solve the mystery of the dancing droplets

This beautifully-made video about a beautifully-colored series of experiments from a Stanford research team showcases how a observing a few droplets of food coloring -- made of water and propylene glycol -- have led t...

ScienceTake: The Praying Mantis Leaps

In this ScienceTake from The New York Times, we watch a young praying mantis leap over and over and over again... a completely fascinating, rather cartoon-like action that can be super-useful for scientists and engin...

Veritasium: How (and Why) Do Chameleons Change Color?

There is a misconception about chameleons... that they change their color in order to blend in with their environment. That is actually not the case... So why do chameleons change color and how are they doing it? ...

AMNH: Shelf Life – Skull of the Olinguito

How was a ninety year old specimen "hiding in plain sight" before it was rescued from storage at The Field Museum and celebrated in 2013 as a newly-identified species? This episode of The American Museum of Natural Hi...

The Physics of Popcorn: Why Popcorn Also Jumps

What happens when a popcorn kernel pops? Heat! Pressure! The hull splits. Water vapor escapes. POP. And then there's a somersault that sends it flying in the air! But how? Watch as ScienceTake explains in detail: ...

Sticky Actuator: Inflatable stick-on “pouch motors”

Here's an excellent idea for your DIY projects: Make sticky actuators! These particular actuators -- motors that convert energy into motion -- are small, inflatable pouches that are custom-printed in thermoplastic...

The Story of Jane Goodall and Her Chimps (2010)

When Jane Goodall was a little girl in the 1930s, she was given a chimpanzee stuffed animal. A constant companion, it and the books she read (Dr. Dolittle and Tarzan novels) fueled her love for both chimps and the Afr...

What makes that fresh rain smell? MIT films rain drops to find out

Why do we smell that fresh earthy scent before and/or after it rains? With high-speed cameras, MIT researchers have filmed rain drops, and believe that the footage explains petrichor, the "pleasant smell that frequent...

AMNH: Shelf Life – Six Ways To Prepare a Coelacanth

The Coelacanth, pronounced see-luh-kanth, is a prehistoric-looking fish that scientists thought had gone extinct 66 to 80 million years ago, until one was discovered in a fisherman's haul near the Chalumna River by So...

AMNH: Shelf Life – Turtles and Taxonomy

The science of classification, specifically the biological taxonomy of organisms, organizes how humans see and study the life that surrounds us. For museum-goers, observing a turtle skull, seaweed leaves, or a cabinet...

Science Take: The Hidden Complexities of the Simple Match

Schlieren flow visualizations illuminate a world of activity that we almost never pay attention to, even when we're causing it to happen. Simple things like breathing, sneezing, clapping hands, or just producing heat ...

Deep Look: The Hidden Perils of Permafrost

When you put a permafrost core in a CT scanner and analyze the data, you're traveling back in time to answer important questions: What was buried deep within the frozen soil? How much of it is ice or plant matter? How...

« Prev