Topic: research

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AMNH: Shelf Life – Skull of the Olinguito

How was a ninety year old specimen "hiding in plain sight" before it was rescued from storage at The Field Museum and celebrated in 2013 as a newly-identified species? This episode of The American Museum of Natural Hi...

The Physics of Popcorn: Why Popcorn Also Jumps

What happens when a popcorn kernel pops? Heat! Pressure! The hull splits. Water vapor escapes. POP. And then there's a somersault that sends it flying in the air! But how? Watch as ScienceTake explains in detail: ...

Sticky Actuator: Inflatable stick-on “pouch motors”

Here's an excellent idea for your DIY projects: Make sticky actuators! These particular actuators -- motors that convert energy into motion -- are small, inflatable pouches that are custom-printed in thermoplastic...

The Story of Jane Goodall and Her Chimps (2010)

When Jane Goodall was a little girl in the 1930s, she was given a chimpanzee stuffed animal. A constant companion, it and the books she read (Dr. Dolittle and Tarzan novels) fueled her love for both chimps and the Afr...

What makes that fresh rain smell? MIT films rain drops to find out

Why do we smell that fresh earthy scent before and/or after it rains? With high-speed cameras, MIT researchers have filmed rain drops, and believe that the footage explains petrichor, the "pleasant smell that frequent...

AMNH: Shelf Life – Six Ways To Prepare a Coelacanth

The Coelacanth, pronounced see-luh-kanth, is a prehistoric-looking fish that scientists thought had gone extinct 66 to 80 million years ago, until one was discovered in a fisherman's haul near the Chalumna River by So...

AMNH: Shelf Life – Turtles and Taxonomy

The science of classification, specifically the biological taxonomy of organisms, organizes how humans see and study the life that surrounds us. For museum-goers, observing a turtle skull, seaweed leaves, or a cabinet...

Science Take: The Hidden Complexities of the Simple Match

Schlieren flow visualizations illuminate a world of activity that we almost never pay attention to, even when we're causing it to happen. Simple things like breathing, sneezing, clapping hands, or just producing heat ...

Deep Look: The Hidden Perils of Permafrost

When you put a permafrost core in a CT scanner and analyze the data, you're traveling back in time to answer important questions: What was buried deep within the frozen soil? How much of it is ice or plant matter? How...

More Evidence Birds Can Count: Where’d that other mealworm go?

Researchers are eagerly tricking wild New Zealand robins, but it's FOR SCIENCE! Watch as this box with a sliding trick drawer helps Alexis Garland and Jason Low at Victoria University of Wellington observe the behavio...

AMNH: Shelf Life – 33 Million Things

What if you could open up a drawer full of hundreds of pinned insect specimens to study them under a microscope, or unscrew the jar cap to scan a curious creature that swam in the deep sea decades ago? For collectors ...

ScienceTake: A Surprising Appetite for Dead Jellyfish

Marine scientists previously suspected that dead jellyfish were not a preferred choice of food for ocean floor scavengers, but a recently-recorded test using Helmet and Lion’s Mane jellyfish has prompted a rethinking ...

ScienceTake: The secrets of a sidewinder snake on a sandy slope

If you've ever run up a sandy hill, you know it can be tough to get up it quickly -- each foot sinking and sliding as you climb upward. Sidewinder snakes, however, can slither up hills rather efficiently, even in comp...

To the Scientists of the Future: Materials science with EUPHRATES

Created by EUPHRATES and Masahiko Sato for Japan's National Institute for Material Science (NIMS), these three "To the Scientists of the Future" short films are a mesmerizing combination of materials research innovati...

Shake Your Silk-Maker: The Dance of the Peacock Spider

When a peacock spider dances, how do we know that it's a really, really good dancer? From their colorful, iridescent body displays, to their wide variety of dance moves, to the different rhythms that they "sing" while...

MIT’s electric cheetah-bot runs offleash

Quiet, efficient, and powerful: MIT's robotic cheetah has a "custom-designed, high-torque-density" electric motor, and can run and jump around without being tethered to an external power source. It's also looking ...

Self-Folding Crawler: A Transformer-style Origami Robot

From flat-packed to self-folding, Harvard graduate student Samuel Felton was inspired by origami when he created a laser-cut robot that could assemble itself and autonomously scurry away. The basic ingredients: two mo...

Outfitting Tree Kangaroos with tiny video cameras

Tree kangaroos are elusive creatures that live high in the trees of New Guinea's tropical rainforests. To learn more about them and to better protect them, Dr. Lisa Dabek has worked with National Geographic and local ...

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