resources

Showing 5 posts tagged resources

What does it take to make a t-shirt? We’ve watched a video about this subject before, but NPR’s Planet Money answered this question in the most amazing way: they traveled across the globe to document the people and processes of this task firsthand. The stories are in five chapters. Above, Chapter 1: Cotton, and below, Chapter 2: Machines

A note for younger viewers: In Chapter 3: People, which features the story of Jasmine Akhter, a garment worker in Bangladesh, there are graphic scenes of the Rana Plaza factory building collapse from 3m10s to 3m52s.

You can watch the entire piece on their information-filled site: Planet Money Makes a T-Shirt.

In the archives: more videos about money and clothing.

via @faketv.

Andy Knowlton finds reusable materials on the streets of Seoul, Korea, makes little dolls with the pieces, and then puts the dolls back out on the streets with a poem that he’s written, all to be discovered later by someone else. Such a great project… the 5 year old suggested that we make our own.

via Booooooom.

Excellent related viewing: Landfill HarmonicLa casa ecológica de botellas, and One Plastic Beach.

In collaboration with the World Wildlife Fund, National Geographic just released a video explaining the impact of a cotton t-shirt: how much water it takes to make just one, how much energy it takes to grow, manufacture, and transport that shirt, and how much water and energy it takes to care for that shirt in your home. The video also explains how we can make a difference in reducing the resources used in care for that shirt: 

One load of washing uses 40 gallons of water. One load of drying uses 5 times more energy than washing. In fact, skipping the ironing and drying of your t-shirt, saves a third of its carbon footprint.

Whether it’s reducing waste, saving energy, or being a conscious consumer, small actions can make a big difference. Think about ways that you could save energy and water.

Interested in a few changes that makes an impact?

1. Buy and share second-hand clothes. Related watching: Jessi Arrington’s Wearing Nothing New TedTalk about buying thrift store clothing. Two favorite quotes: “Color is powerful. It is almost physiologically impossible to be in a bad mood when you’re wearing bright red pants.” and ”Fitting in is way overrated.” 

2. Buy a drying rack at a local store and let the sun (or the heat in your house) do all of the work!

Watch more videos about conservation here.