rock

Showing 9 posts tagged rock

When you take the music out of this Michel Gondry-directed music video for The White Stripes, it looks a bit like a Sesame Street video from the 1970s. This is a “musicless” version of The Hardest Button to Button, one in a sound experiment series edited and remixed by Mario Wienerroither.

Related stop-motion: Shugo Tokumaru’s Katachi, Royal Canoe’s Bathtubs, Ben Garvin’s Magic Beard, and More (The Hunter Pixilation Project), a video inspired by Joey Ramone.

via Sploid.

How can we know the size, composition, and atmospheric makeup of distant exoplanets? NASA explains the details in this Alien Atmospheres video. 

By observing periodic variations in the parent star’s brightness and color, astronomers can indirectly determine an exoplanet’s distance from its star, its size, and its mass. But to truly understand an exoplanet astronomers must study its atmosphere, and they do so by splitting apart the parent star’s light during a planetary transit. 

Watch more astronomy videos, including Measuring the Universe and The Hubble Ultra Deep Field.

via Boing Boing.

Meet Siats (pronounced SEE-otts) Meekerorum, the first giant mega-predator to be discovered in North America — specifically in the Utah desert — in over 60 years. In this Untamed Science video, we hear from Dr. Lindsay Zanno, Director of the Paleontology & Geology Research Laboratory at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, who explains how this 30 foot long, 4-ton, carnivorous creature flourished in the tens of millions of years before T-Rex ruled.

Untamed Science has visited Dr. Zanno before: Paleontology 101, a must-watch for anyone who loves dinosaurs.

via Scientific American.

And here I thought this was just an animated gif, but no, via Daily Picks & Flicks, there’s a video of a diver making a bubble ring or vortex ring, above.

A vortex ring is the phenomenon where a quantity of fluid or gas in a toroid (donut) shape, travels through a medium of fluid or gas, while spinning like a thick circular bracelet that is being rolled off of a person’s arm. (Except the spin is in the opposite direction as when a bracelet is rolled off in this way.)

And evidently there are a series of videos from this diver. Here are two more:

Are these videos real? Yes, we’re pretty sure they are. So how exactly is this done? A small burst of air is released into a toroidal or poloidal vortex, essentially a spinning donut of water. 

Bubble rings are actually made of two different rings, one inside the other, spinning in the same direction. The outer ring is made of water, and the inner one is made of air… 

From YouTube User Maxwel Hohn, How to make a horizontal bubble ring:

Just remember to always be safe when underwater. Please conduct all experiments with adult supervision. 

Related watching: make your own underwater vortex ring generator, make a homemade vortex cannon, or the viral video of cetaceans blowing bubble rings.