science friday

Showing 8 posts tagged science friday

Maple trees + good timing + basic chemistry = maple syrup. But Science Friday takes us behind the scenes of maple syrup research to show that there’s much more to it than that. While the tradition has been to tap fully grown wild trees – commercially with lots of plastic tubing – recent experiments at University of Vermont’s Proctor Maple Research Center have found that harvesting from the cut tops of juvenile trees might yield 5 to 6 times per acre, surprisingly without harming the young trees.

Lots of questions about this one: What are the other differences between the farm vs forest model of growing trees? Does this new process affect the local birds or creatures underground? What do these young trees look like in 20 years? What questions do you have?

File under: food, trees, and how things are made.

From Science Friday.

Physiology, gravity, and fluid dynamics all come together in The Other Golden Rule from Science Friday. Learn how videos, data, equations, and fieldwork with creatures great and small helped researchers at Georgia Tech discover that most mammals take around the same amount of time to urinate.

In the archives: there’s more Science Friday and more videos about bodies.

Storytelling, shadows, and 3D viewing come together in this Science Friday report, Dark Art. Biology grad student Tom McDonagh tells of the first balloon trip across the English Channel in 1785, and how he and other puppeteers are telling the story with laser cut puppets and 3D shadows. Yes, 3D shadows.

There are more puppetsa few shadows, and more Science Friday vids in the archives.

From Science Friday, behold A Spacesuit Ballet

Of the suit he wore on the moon, Neil Armstrong wrote, “it was tough, reliable, and almost cuddly.” But that cuddly suit, made by the company Playtex, had some stiff competition (literally) from rival rigid, metal designs. This video features archival NASA footage of mobility tests for several spacesuit prototypes. Music is from the band One Ring Zero’s album “Planets”.

Hey kids! Go rest your hands on a speaker playing loud music. Feel the sound vibrations? Good. Now you might want to adjust your volume for this one.

Sound frequencies produce a variety of increasingly intricate resonance patterns. And if you sprinkle sand or salt on a metal plate that is vibrating from these sound frequencies, you can see the patterns.

Did I explain that correctly? If not, Science Friday has a great video that explains it super clearly. Highly recommended.