Topic: science friday

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Bear In Mind The Muskox

Muskoxen are not the only charismatic creatures perfectly suited to the wind-blasted, tundra of the Alaskan Arctic. Meet Joel Berger, Wildlife Conservation Society senior scientist, Colorado State University professor...

Creating The Never-Ending Bloom: John Edmark’s spiral geometries

Artist, designer, inventor, and Stanford professor John Edmark creates sculptures that are driven by precise mathematics, but his interest in spiral geometries is driven by something more enigmatic... "a search for un...

What to Expect From an Expecting Seahorse

Although it's well known that seahorses and their cousins the pipefish are the only vertebrates where males become pregnant, researchers have only begun to understand how this unique adaptation works. By studying the ...

The Fungi in Your Future: Mushroom leather, furniture, and more

Mushrooms come in a wide variety of species, they recycle dead plants which helps to create nutrient soil, and they can be turned into food, furniture, packaging, leather, and more. Enter MycoWorks, a team of engineer...

The Rolling Dance Chair, an omnidirectional, hands-free wheelchair

So often, knowing someone who deals with a challenge can help us become more empathetic and more aware of possible solutions for that challenge. Having grown up with a father who she felt was "boxed in" by his manual ...

Engineering the Perfect Pop

Using scissors, tape, and reams of creativity, Matthew Reinhart engineers paper to bend, fold, and transform into fantastic creatures, structures and locales. By adjusting the angles of folds and the depth of layers, ...

I, Octopus – Science Friday

With thousands of chemically-sensitive suckers, color-changing skin, and a brain that literally stretches when they eat, octopuses seem like aliens living in our oceans. Understanding their physical adaptations and ho...

Superbloom: How Death Valley Springs to Life – Science Friday

Death Valley is the driest place in the United States and is known as the hottest place on Earth (though there are places that are hotter). On top of that, average rainfall is less than 2 inches (5 cm). How can a plac...

Go on a Snowflake Safari

The next time you're going out in the snow, take a magnifying glass with you and see if you can find an elusive 12-sided snowflake... and if you don't happen to see that one, take note of the ones you do find. Is it n...

Subvisual Subway – The Art of New York City’s Bacterial World

Why do we wash our hands after we've been riding on public transportation? Is it true that "using the handrails on the subway is like shaking hands with 100 people"? New York City-based typographer and designer Craig ...

Jump In Jerboas – Science Friday

"A furry little rodent version of a Tyrannosaurus Rex," the jerboa has tiny forelimbs, a "noodle" tail that helps with them with balance, long legs and really long feet, with toes that support their speedy hops. W...

How to grow snowflakes in a bottle – Science Friday

If there's no snow outside, try growing your own snowflakes. From Science Friday's collection of Holiday Science features and experiments, learn how to grow snowflakes in a bottle. Caltech physicist, snowflake expert,...

Filming bats with slow motion & thermal cameras

Studying bats can be smelly and messy, but bat biologist Nickolay Hristov explains why he finds his job to be such an exhilarating endeavor. As he attends to high speed cameras at a cave mouth in South Central Texas, ...

How do plants grow in space? – Science Friday

Microgravity, different kinds of light, extreme conditions... Growing while in orbit or on Mars are two experiences that earthbound organisms have never needed to adapt to in our evolutionary history. How do our bodie...

The Unlikely Tale of a Tenacious Snail – Science Friday

Not seen or collected for science since 1933, the oblong rocksnail of Alabama's Cahaba River was declared extinct in 2000. In 2011, biology grad student Nathan Whelan took a second look at a tiny rock he had picked up...

Run, Octopus, Run! – Science Friday

Crawling, swimming, embracing, squeezing, camouflaging... running? Why would an agile octopus, like the algae octopus or the coconut octopus, choose to use two of their eight arms to stand up and "run" backwards? Mont...

Studying the deep sea octopus Opisthoteuthis “Adorabilis”

From Science Friday's The Macroscope, Post Doctoral Researcher Stephanie Bush of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) introduces us to a tiny Opisthoteuthis deep-sea octopus, a creature that's in the s...

How is an ice sculpture made? SciFri investigates frozen water

What's So Cool About Frozen Water? Art and science come together to uncover some ice-expert-level details in this 2012 Science Friday report. Shintaro Okamoto, founder of NYC's Okamoto Studio, and Erland Schulson, Dar...

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