science

Showing 399 posts tagged science

Sesame Street's Telly teams up with 5facts' Annie Colbert and Matt Silverman to explore sand, chalk, strawberries, velcro, and lint up close: 5 Hidden Worlds Revealed Under a “MEGA” MICROSCOPE, microscope, microscope…

For more science, tech, engineering, and math with Sesame Street, check out SesameStreet.org/STEM, and in the archives: Annie, Matt, and Grover do science.

Generate your own electricity with some wire, a magnetic field, and the relative movement between the two of them: Alom Shaha explains electromagnetic induction using this hand-powered – or perhaps more accurately, bacon-sandwich-powered – generator.

Related watching: magnetic fields, probably one of the more awe-inducing subjects on this blog.

via Science Demo.

The question “Who was the first human?” was a very popular one in our house just last year, but the evolution videos we had in the archives – even the awesome Five Fingers of Evolution TED Ed video – didn’t answer it directly enough for my kids. This visual-filled video timeline from Joe Hanson of It’s Okay to Be Smart does: There was no first human.

You can never pinpoint the exact moment that a species came to be, because it never did. Just like how you used to be a baby and now you’re older, but there was no single day when you went to bed young and woke up old…

There was no first human. It sounds like a paradox, it sounds like it breaks the whole theory of evolution, but it’s really a key to truly understanding how evolution works. 

Also, your grandparents (a hundred eight-five million generations removed) were fish!

In the archives, more videos about evolution, Neil deGrasse Tyson explains evolution, and a related must-watch video about our human history: Carl Sagan’s Cosmic Calendar from the original Cosmos.

From jtotheizzoe.

How Do We Know How Old the Sun Is? The Royal Observatory, Greenwich, and animation studio Beakus join together to explain how Kepler and Newton’s laws help us figure out the weight of the sun, how the age of our solar system can be calculated by studying meteorites, and how that data helps us determine the sun’s age.

Previously from the Royal Observatory Greenwich, Measuring the Universe, and more videos about the sun.

Bill Nye The Science Guy bikes down a long road in wide open country to demonstrate a scale model of the solar system – a classic clip. Total distance of his ride to Pluto, back before Pluto was known as a dwarf planet: almost 2.5 miles (4 kilometers).

Related links: Scale of the Universe, Distance to Mars, and If the Moon Were Only One Pixel.

Related watching: Carl Sagan’s Pale Blue Dot, animated, Charles and Ray Eames’ Powers of Ten, Veritasium’s How Far Away is the Moon?, and the Royal Observatory’s Measuring the Universe.