Topic: science

Sort: Date | Title | Sort Ascending
View:

How do we know what stars are made of?

How do astronomers know what stars are made of when those stars are light years away from Earth? These demonstrations by Dr Francisco Diego reveal the colors of light that are produced from sodium chloride, rubidium c...

What happens when you put marshmallows in a vacuum?

Thanks to this hand pump vacuum sealer demo, we can see how these four fluffy marshmallows will react when the air is pumped out of their clear container. Poof, poof, poof! What's going on here? From Physics.org: ...

The next generation of Boston Dynamics’ Atlas robot

If you happen to meet a seemingly delightful, untethered robot who is casually rearranging 10 lb boxes in a warehouse space, please don't push it with a hockey stick or knock it over unkindly. This video is only a dem...

A titanosaur in 360° VR with Sir David Attenborough

From the BBC's Attenborough and the Giant Dinosaur, this is a 360 degree virtual reality introduction to the 70-ton dinosaur known as a titanosaur. Grab a smartphone headset, or view it on your phone or desktop. S...

ALMA, a telescope so powerful it can see into the past

There’s a telescope deep in Chile’s Atacama Desert that takes pictures so massive that it requires a supercomputer as powerful as 16 million PCs to decipher the images. This is the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA...

The Hidden World of Chocolate

You've seen chocolate... but have you seen it under a scanning electron microscope? Johns Hopkins University grad student Jennifer Dailey leads students through a bit of chocolate testing: heating and cooling chocolat...

Explore The Solar System: 360 Degree Interactive Tour

Tour our solar system in a information-packed, beautifully-animated way, with this 360 Degree Interactive Tour from Crash Course, Thought Café, and Crash Course Astronomy host Phil Plait. Grab your Cardboard VR kit, o...

LIGO & The First Observation of Gravitational Waves – CalTech

On September 14, 2015 at 5:51am ET, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detected ripples in the fabric of spacetime. One hundred years after Albert Einstein predicted the existence of gravit...

Can you push a spacecraft with light? – Physics Girl

In this episode from Physics Girl, Dianna Cowern explains how space ships can use sunlight to travel the stars in the same way that boats use wind to move across the seas. While solar sail spacecraft design is a more ...

Venus flytraps count to avoid being tricked

If you're a venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), how do you know you've got a fly in your midst and not a raindrop? You count. Via ScienceMag: In order to mimic insect prey, the scientists stimulated the hairlike sen...

Go on a Snowflake Safari

The next time you're going out in the snow, take a magnifying glass with you and see if you can find an elusive 12-sided snowflake... and if you don't happen to see that one, take note of the ones you do find. Is it n...

Evidence of a Ninth Planet

Thanks to mathematical modeling and computer simulations by CalTech researchers Konstantin Batygin and Mike Brown, we now have strong evidence that there's a large planet -- about 10x Earth's size -- orbiting in an ex...

Subvisual Subway – The Art of New York City’s Bacterial World

Why do we wash our hands after we've been riding on public transportation? Is it true that "using the handrails on the subway is like shaking hands with 100 people"? New York City-based typographer and designer Craig ...

The Foldscope – A Paper Microscope that Costs $1

To help make microscopes as accessible and as sturdy as pencils, Stanford University biophysicist Manu Prakash created an ultra-low-cost origami-based microscope. He was inspired by a 2011 visit to a Thailand clinic w...

Why Do Deep Sea Creatures Look So Scary?

Why Do Deep Sea Creatures Look So Scary? Anna Rothschild of Gross Science explains how different it is at the bottom of the sea: Food can be scarce, there's tremendous ocean pressure, and it's dark. These environmenta...

Meet the Titanosaur at AMNH

A mighty Titanosaur, the recently-discovered herbivore that measures 37.186 meters (122 feet) long, now stands on the fourth floor of New York City's American Museum of Natural History. Its discovery is so recent (201...

The Stroop Test

After we learn to read, recognizing words becomes an automatic behavior that our brains can process much faster than recognizing colors. For example, say these words: Red. Green. Blue. So what happens when we intro...

The iPhone of Slide Rules – Numberphile

From Numberphile, science and math writer Alex Bellos introduces the slide rule and then shares "the iPhone of Slide Rules" -- the Halden Calculex. On the pocket-sized disk made in Manchester, circa 1906, CollectingMe...