Topic: science

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ExpeRimental: How to Make Balancing Sculptures

Physics! Engineering! Kinetic sculptures! Snacks! Learn about the science of stability (and instability) while making these delicious DIY balancing sculptures. In this episode of ExpeRimental, Ri's Director of Sci...

Circuit Playground: F is for Frequency

Who better than a talking oscilloscope to explain what frequency is and why it's so important for radio and sound waves! Come learn with ADABOT in this episode of Circuit Playground: F is for Frequency.

The Brain Scoop: Fossil Sharks

The Megalodon Shark and Helicoprion: two mysterious, extinct sharks that have left fossilized clues of their existence in the form of their teeth (and some vertebrae). Get a close look at the largest shark tooth and a...

Minute Physics: Why are Stars Star-Shaped?

If we know that stars are massive spheres of hot gases, then why do we draw them with lots of twinkly points? Why doesn't "star-shaped" mean a round shape? The answer: We see stars as pointy (and so does the Hubble Sp...

Solar Powered Classroom

When Aaron Sebens started talking about renewable energy with his fourth grade class, they kept coming back to their excitement about solar power and making it a more hands-on learning experience. How might they move ...

Storm Chasing on Saturn: The hexagon-shaped hurricane

Hexagon-shaped storms exist. There is a massive, persistent, hexagon-shaped jet stream on Saturn’s north pole -- "the perfect six-sided hurricane, 60 miles deep, that could swallow four Earths..." The New York Tim...

The Curiosity Show: How does a music box work?

In this clip from Australia's The Curiosity Show, science educator and co-host Deane Hutton demonstrates the basics of sound, moving air particles, and forced vibrations with a plastic comb, hacksaw blades, the metal ...

Eva Szasz’s Cosmic Zoom (1968)

From director Eva Szasz and the National Film Board of Canada, Cosmic Zoom (1968) is a wordless journey that attempts to demonstrate the scale of the universe. Beginning with a boy boating on the Ottawa River, we trav...

The Chemistry of Rockets: How do rockets work?

How are controlled explosions made just right so that they'll generate the kind of thrust that sends a rocket up, up, up and beyond our atmosphere? Analytical Chemist Raychelle Burks, Ph.D., explains how solid and...

A match being struck as seen with Schlieren technique

From RMIT University, watch a match being struck and lit, captured by a technique called Schlieren flow visualization. From FY! Fluid Dynamics: The schlieren optical technique is ideal for visualizing differences ...

How the Sun Sees You: Revealing human skin in ultraviolet light

Artist Thomas Leveritt set up a ultraviolet camera and viewing monitor in Brooklyn's Prospect Park to show people what their skin looks like in ultraviolet light. This is "how the sun sees you." The revealed freckles ...

ScienceTake: For Kangaroos, Tail Becomes a Fifth Leg

What makes a leg a leg? What if a leg is a kangaroo tail? In a recent study, scientists observed, recorded, and measured data for five red kangaroos that were trained to walk slowly on a force-measuring platform. T...

Sixteen year old Elif Bilgin turned banana peels into a bioplastic

After two years of research, experiments, and failed trials, 16-year-old Elif Bilgin developed a new process for turning banana peels into a non-decaying bioplastic, a more eco-friendly alternative to petroleum-based ...

The Brain Scoop: In Search of Fossil Fish

Go fishing for 52-million year old fish with Emily Graslie of The Brain Scoop. In this episode, she's In Search of Fossil Fish with The Field Museum at Wyoming's Fossil Lake, an early Eocene treasure trove of fossiliz...

Self-Folding Crawler: A Transformer-style Origami Robot

From flat-packed to self-folding, Harvard graduate student Samuel Felton was inspired by origami when he created a laser-cut robot that could assemble itself and autonomously scurry away. The basic ingredients: two mo...

Everything You Need to Know About Planet Earth

When we wake up, eat breakfast, get ready for school or work, and head out the door, we may not be thinking about how incredibly unique our small, wet rock of a planet is. But the Earth is incredibly unique. Learn som...

Dr. Mae Jemison, NASA Astronaut: I Wanted To Go Into Space

Find out why NASA astronaut Dr. Mae Jemison wanted to go into space in this profile from NOVA's The Secret Life of Scientists and Engineers. A physician, a chemical engineer, a teacher, a dancer, and the first Afri...

REMUS SharkCam: The hunter and the hunted

When the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution team took their REMUS "SharkCam" underwater vehicle -- equipped with six camera views -- to Mexico's Guadalupe Island, they expected to track and film great white sharks f...