Topic: science

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Ice crystals form on the surfaces of backlit bubbles

It became a tradition since last year, so as there was almost -20 degrees (Celsius), I made some freezing bubbles for my kids. Couldn't stop myself from filming it again :) From Warsaw-based photographer and videog...

The science of milk

Milk is poured into cereal. We might want milk for our cookies or hot chocolate. We can use milk to bake. It's usually in our cheeses, butters, and ice creams. Milk is often the first thing we drink as newborn babies....

Electromagnetic Levitation Quadcopter

On a visit to Hyperloop One, a Los Angeles-based team working to create a near-vacuum tube-based transportation system, Veratasium's Derek Muller got to check out this Electromagnetic Levitation Quadcopter demo. In th...

Star Parties In Our National Parks: Parks After Dark

Visit the Grand Canyon and Death Valley with Planetary Society volunteer and national park enthusiast CaLisa Lee as she learns about Star Parties and the Parks After Dark. Thanks to our 59 untouched national parks, wh...

An origami-inspired model for reconfigurable materials

Metamaterials — materials whose function is determined by structure, not composition — have been designed to bend light and sound, transform from soft to stiff, and even dampen seismic waves from earthquakes. But each...

Climbing Wind Turbines for a Living

Converting kinetic energy into electrical power as they spin, wind turbines are a growing part of the world's renewable energy solutions. Rock climber and wind turbine technician Jessica Kilroy inspects, maintains, an...

What to Expect From an Expecting Seahorse

Although it's well known that seahorses and their cousins the pipefish are the only vertebrates where males become pregnant, researchers have only begun to understand how this unique adaptation works. By studying the ...

What can you do with a large neodymium magnet?

Neodymium magnets are really strong. The larger they get, the more careful you need to be to avoid being pinched or struck from the force of their attraction. This video from Magnetic Games cautiously explores what ca...

The Dodder Vine Sniffs Out Its Prey

From PBS Nature, watch as researchers Consuelo M. De Moraes and Mark Mesker conduct a series of experiments to find out if the dodder vine (Cuscuta pentagona), a parasitic plant that depends on a host plant to provide...

Here’s Where the Juice That Powers Batteries Comes From

Atomic number 3 on the periodic table, lithium is the 'li' in the li-ion batteries that are inside of our smartphones, laptops, digital cameras, and electric vehicles. Above, Alejandro Bucher gives Bloomberg's Ashlee ...

The toy-inspired Paperfuge, an innovative new tool in healthcare

Bioengineer and Stanford researcher Manu Prakash has developed another inexpensive scientific device. The Paperfuge is a hand-spun, ultra low-cost, paper and string centrifuge that was inspired by the ancient whirligi...

Madeline the Robot Tamer & Mimus

Inventor and designer Madeline Gannon developed a gesture-based robot communication software as an artist-in-residence at Pier 9 in San Francisco. She's now developed something (someone?) new as the next step in her e...

The World’s First Poo Museum

How might you preserve scat -- an animal's fecal dropping, poo, or poop -- for the world's first poo museum? ...or pooseum? In this BBC Earth Unplugged episode, Maddie Moate visits with Daniel Roberts, co-founder ...

The synchronization of 100 metronomes

From the Ikeguchi Laboratory in their pursuit of studying nonlinear chaotic dynamics, watch as 100 metronomes synchronize to the exact same timing. The key is the surface that the metronomes are on: a hanging platform...

Scott Weaver’s ‘Rolling through the Bay’ toothpick sculpture

This nine foot tall wooden sculpture of San Francisco was made with glue and 105,387 and a half toothpicks. It was built by Scott Weaver who, stuck at home at the age of 14 with spinal meningitis, started working in e...

Why does a frozen lake sound like a Star Wars blaster?

Ice can make all sorts of sounds: cracking, crackling, musical booooooms... and that pew! pew! Star Wars blaster sound. How? In this episode of NPR's Skunk Bear, we learn about acoustic dispersion and how the phenomen...

A Journey To The Bottom Of The Internet

The internet is powered by over 300 heavy duty underwater cables that carry 99% of all international data from continent to continent to right at your fingertips almost instantaneously. In this episode of Nat & Lo, Na...

A home made string shooter & slow moving waves in rope

This string shooter uses two wheels on motors to push a string forward while a tube guides the string back through the wheels, creating a constant loop that appears to defy gravity and demonstrates wave phenomena. ...