Topic: science

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A match being struck as seen with Schlieren technique

From RMIT University, watch a match being struck and lit, captured by a technique called Schlieren flow visualization. From FY! Fluid Dynamics: The schlieren optical technique is ideal for visualizing differences ...

How the Sun Sees You: Revealing human skin in ultraviolet light

Artist Thomas Leveritt set up a ultraviolet camera and viewing monitor in Brooklyn's Prospect Park to show people what their skin looks like in ultraviolet light. This is "how the sun sees you." The revealed freckles ...

ScienceTake: For Kangaroos, Tail Becomes a Fifth Leg

What makes a leg a leg? What if a leg is a kangaroo tail? In a recent study, scientists observed, recorded, and measured data for five red kangaroos that were trained to walk slowly on a force-measuring platform. T...

Sixteen year old Elif Bilgin turned banana peels into a bioplastic

After two years of research, experiments, and failed trials, 16-year-old Elif Bilgin developed a new process for turning banana peels into a non-decaying bioplastic, a more eco-friendly alternative to petroleum-based ...

The Brain Scoop: In Search of Fossil Fish

Go fishing for 52-million year old fish with Emily Graslie of The Brain Scoop. In this episode, she's In Search of Fossil Fish with The Field Museum at Wyoming's Fossil Lake, an early Eocene treasure trove of fossiliz...

Self-Folding Crawler: A Transformer-style Origami Robot

From flat-packed to self-folding, Harvard graduate student Samuel Felton was inspired by origami when he created a laser-cut robot that could assemble itself and autonomously scurry away. The basic ingredients: two mo...

Everything You Need to Know About Planet Earth

When we wake up, eat breakfast, get ready for school or work, and head out the door, we may not be thinking about how incredibly unique our small, wet rock of a planet is. But the Earth is incredibly unique. Learn som...

Dr. Mae Jemison, NASA Astronaut: I Wanted To Go Into Space

Find out why NASA astronaut Dr. Mae Jemison wanted to go into space in this profile from NOVA's The Secret Life of Scientists and Engineers. A physician, a chemical engineer, a teacher, a dancer, and the first Afri...

REMUS SharkCam: The hunter and the hunted

When the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution team took their REMUS "SharkCam" underwater vehicle -- equipped with six camera views -- to Mexico's Guadalupe Island, they expected to track and film great white sharks f...

How Do You Dismantle a Dino? (Very Carefully)

We've learned a lot about dinosaur anatomy since displays of their bones were set up at The National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., "anywhere from the early 1900s through 1940s, 50s, and 60s." As a par...

ASIMO, the world’s most advanced humanoid robot (2014)

The world's most advanced humanoid robot can run smoothly at a record 9kph (5.6mph), recognizes faces and voices, shakes hands, has incredible balance -- can jump, hop, climb stairs, kick soccer balls, pour drinks wit...

ExpeRimental: How to Make Static Magic

Reveal your kids' Jedi powers using static electricity with this episode of ExpeRimental from The Royal Institution of Great Britain. Watch ordinary household objects move without being touched as neuroscientist Profe...

Summertime Science: Sunburn, Sweat, and Wrinkly Fingers

Why do we sweat? Why do our fingers wrinkle in water? Why do we get sunburns? Joe Hanson explains it all in this summer science episode of It's Okay to Be Smart. Bonus: find out what those SPF numbers mean on your sun...

Why aren’t we only using solar power?

Solar power is cleaner, more sustainable, and in many cases, less expensive than coal-fueled power plants, so why aren't we only using solar power? Beyond the business and infrastructural challenges, TED Ed outlines s...

Fish that walk: Tasmania’s Spotted Handfish

With pectoral fins that look like little feet, this "walking" Spotted Handfish was one of the first fish documented in Australian waters, and is not the only known handfish -- there are pink, red, and yellow species, ...

Spectroscopy of Stars – Wonders of the Universe

Understand what the universe is made of by looking at the light of its stars. In this clip from Wonders of the Universe – Stardust, Professor Brian Cox demonstrates how chemical elements emit a unique set of colors wh...

NASA’s Rover of the Future

Omni-drive and suit ports will be just two of the NASA rover features available to future astronauts as they explore Mars or near-Earth asteroids. This Rover of the Future is an ever-evolving Space Exploration Vehicle...

ScienceTake: How an Embryo Grows

From a single cell to a whole organism, how do animals grow into such diverse and complex creatures from their embryonic beginnings? What if we could follow and map a human's development from a single cell to the esti...