scuba diving

Showing 6 posts tagged scuba diving

In Onward: Searching for Life in Iceland’s Frigid Fissures, National Geographic grantee and biology researcher Jónína Ólafsdóttir goes diving in search of tiny arthropods in the underwater volcanic fissures of Iceland’s Thingvellir National Park. She is joined by NatGeo multimedia journalists Spencer Millsap and Dan Stone.

“When I started doing this research, I was amazed that no one had ever done it before,” she said one morning earlier this week as we drove to her favorite dive site. Iceland has a lot of research questions related to biology and geology that have never been answered, let alone even asked. “Iceland is a really great place for a scientist with an explorer’s heart,” she says…

Ecologists are often asked why they might study one particular animal, especially a small one that has little impact on humans. Jónína’s answer goes like this: humanity might never be dependent on microscopic arthropods but understanding how animals work together, how they depend on each other holds lots more clues about an area’s environmental history—and its future. At the top of the world, seeing how species change and adapt may indicate what happens as the climate changes around the world.

Read more about Ólafsdóttir's research at National Geographic, and check out more scuba diving videos in the archives. 

via Doobybrain.

From PBS Digital Studios’s UnderH2O team, go on a Blackwater Drift Dive

The vast, unexplored ocean is filled with wonderful and mysterious creatures. This week, we journey far offshore for a midnight drift dive with over 1,000 feet of water between us and the seafloor. The animals here are bizarre and beautiful, and little is known about their biology. 

Related viewing: The Deep SeaThe Secret Life of Plankton, The Plankton Chronicles: Sea Urchin, and Green Bomber Worms.

And here I thought this was just an animated gif, but no, via Daily Picks & Flicks, there’s a video of a diver making a bubble ring or vortex ring, above.

A vortex ring is the phenomenon where a quantity of fluid or gas in a toroid (donut) shape, travels through a medium of fluid or gas, while spinning like a thick circular bracelet that is being rolled off of a person’s arm. (Except the spin is in the opposite direction as when a bracelet is rolled off in this way.)

And evidently there are a series of videos from this diver. Here are two more:

Are these videos real? Yes, we’re pretty sure they are. So how exactly is this done? A small burst of air is released into a toroidal or poloidal vortex, essentially a spinning donut of water. 

Bubble rings are actually made of two different rings, one inside the other, spinning in the same direction. The outer ring is made of water, and the inner one is made of air… 

From YouTube User Maxwel Hohn, How to make a horizontal bubble ring:

Just remember to always be safe when underwater. Please conduct all experiments with adult supervision. 

Related watching: make your own underwater vortex ring generator, make a homemade vortex cannon, or the viral video of cetaceans blowing bubble rings.

YouTuber westh2o was diving underwater with friends in Moorea, French Polynesia when they began to hear the whale song of a humpback whale. Westh2o writes:

The recording does not do justice to the actual sound. Seriously some of those sounds vibrated my chest. I didn’t realize whales had such a wide frequency of sound. Some were mid to hi frequency and some were very low.

As they swam into the depths, straining their eyes to find the sound’s source in the cloudiness of the water, the vocalizations became louder, and then something huge began to emerge. Here’s a glimpse: 

Watch the video to get a reeeally good look. And then watch more whale encounters here, here, and here

via PetaPixel.

Underwater footage shot whilst scuba diving in the Fiji islands and Tonga. Featuring colorful coral reefs, huge schools of tropical fish, sharks, humpback whales, underwater caves, scuba divers and much more marine life from the south Pacific.

Bonus: click the CC button for closed captions on this video from Bubble Vision, or enjoy the convenient list that they put together in the video description, (click Show More below the vid) for labeled names of the dive sites and marine life in each shot.

Thanks, @MollyWesterman