sculpture

Showing 21 posts tagged sculpture

This is something that we’d like to see and hear in person: The Singing, Ringing Tree was designed by architects Mike Tonkin and Anna Liu in 2006. It sits on a hill in Lancashire, England, and as the winds blow, the discordant steel pipes “play” the wind. From Wikipedia

Some of the pipes are primarily structural and aesthetic elements, while others have been cut across their width enabling the sound. The harmonic and singing qualities of the tree were produced by tuning the pipes according to their length by adding holes to the underside of each.

There’s more wind and more sound in the archives, including the similar Aeolus, an Acoustic Wind Pavilion, some a whale song-filled diving encounter, and the Sesame Street classic How a Saxophone is Made

Thanks, @benjohnbarnes.

Swiss painter, sculptor, and photographer Markus Raetz creates lyrical art that explores illusion and perception. In the piece above, rotating leaves of cut metal reveal a “turning” head in the illuminated space between them. In Yes/No, below, your point of view changes the response given:

You can see more videos of Raetz’s work, including a 10m documentary, at Visual News.

In the archives: optical illusionskinetic sculptures, and perception.

via Sploid.

In this time lapse video, nature history and prehistoric life modeler Gary Staab studies, welds, sculpts, and paints to create a large crocodile sculpture with his team. Staab has worked for clients like National Geographic, the American Museum of Natural History, Walt Disney Animation, and the Smithsonian. This sculpture will tour the United States in an exhibition called “Crocs — Ancient Predators in a Modern World.”

Related watching: paleo-artist John GurcheFlorentijn Hofman’s Feestaardvarken (Partyaardvark), and The Secret Story of Toys.

Thanks, Michael.

"The human story is really nothing short of the story of a little corner of the universe becoming aware of itself." From National Geographic, paleo-artist John Gurche creates realistic human likenesses of our ancient ancestors. You can see them almost come to life at the Smithsonian’s Hall of Human Origins.

In the archives: more history, more humanity, and more evolution.