seasons

Showing 13 posts tagged seasons

Every year, regardless of weather, the Westerly Morris Men celebrate the vernal equinox and the first day of spring with a pre-dawn hike up to the summit of Lantern Hill in North Stonington, Connecticut. There, they sing and dance to help the sun come up.

The hike and celebration is a 28 year tradition for this particular dance team, as captured above in 2012, but Morris dance, a form of English folk dance, dates back as early as 1448.

Watch a few more traditions, including our favorite spring tradition: this MGM Happy Harmonies cartoon from 1936, To Spring.

Why to some leaves change color in the fall? This experiment, Leaf Color Chromatography with Bite Sci-zed’s Alex Dainis, is the perfect autumn weekend project to learn about chlorophyll, carotenoids, xanthophylls, and anthocyanins.

Get some rubbing alcohol, white coffee filters, a few clear glasses, scissors, and a wooden spoon. Next, head outside to find leaves that are at different stages of their color change — around 10 per color. For additional info, read more about this experiment at SciAm

In the archives: more Bite Sci-zed, more autumn, and more experiments.

Frozen by Maxim & Katia Mezentsev, with music by Nebulo, could probably continue for another minute. Not only is it fun to watch, but it’s an interesting DIY project: freeze objects in blocks of ice, film them melting, and then play the clips backwards. What will you freeze?

Watch more ice in the archives: The Last Ice Merchant, Premier Automne, Instant Ice Crystals, Scenic Journey to the Bottom of a Lake, and The Arrow of Time with Professor Brian Cox

via Vimeo.

Polar Bears Eat Goose Eggs in the Arctic’s summer months, but now scientists are studying how melting sea ice might affect the bears’ eating habits in the years to come. Will more eggs be on their menu? Utah State University Ph.D candidate David Iles narrates this remote camera footage from Western Hudson Bay near Churchill, Manitoba, as we watch polar bears find these high-calorie snacks (and a few of the birds that laid them): 

“In terms of snow geese there’s 50,000 pairs out there, and that could be quite a substantial benefit to polar bears that do happen to take advantage of them,” he continued. “But what we don’t yet know is how often that overlap happens, what types of bears are taking advantage, and what it could mean for both polar bears and waterfowl.”

There are more details about the balance of these animals and the changing ecosystem that they share in this corresponding National Geographic article.

Related bears-on-hidden-camera fun: What goes on when you are not there.