skeleton

Showing 10 posts tagged skeleton

Watch young David Attenborough try to piece together a massive broken egg shell (given to him by locals) in this 1961 clip from Zoo Quest to Madagascar: The Elephant Bird Egg.

The Elephant Bird was a large, ostrich or emu-like, flightless bird that lived on the island of Madagascar until its extinction, likely in the 17th or 18th century. How tall was it? From Wikipedia

Aepyornis, believed to have been more than 3 m (10 ft) tall and weighing close to 400 kg (880 lb), was at the time the world’s largest bird. Remains of Aepyornis adults and eggs have been found; in some cases the eggs have a circumference of more than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) and a length up to 34 cm (13 in). The egg volume is about 160 times greater than that of a chicken egg.

Below, Sir David visits the Elephant Bird’s skeleton in a museum in the capital city of Antananarivo:

In the archives, Madagascar’s Giraffe Weevilweaver birds weaving and dancing Clark’s Grebes.

In 1999, near the Cape Verde Islands, “an unusually large Caulophryne pelagica [anglerfish] was captured in perfect condition, due perhaps to a lethargy induced by a prodigious meal which had expanded the stomach in excess of the standard length.” Not long after, the rare, deep-sea specimen was a part of the Natural History Museum's collection in London.

Only 17 examples of the hairy anglerfish have been discovered thus far, and this was the largest, so scientists were reluctant to cut it open for examination. However, a 3D scan of the fish could easily reveal its huge last meal.

Related watching: The Brilliance of Bioluminescence, skeletons, and more fish.

Travel a span of 160 years, from the world’s first dinosaur exhibition, based on the scientific findings of 1854, to a multi-million dollar exhibition that aims to be the most scientifically accurate representation of dinosaurs ever.

In this clip from BBC Earth, Dr Alice Roberts visits Dinosaur Court at London’s Crystal Palace and then talks with Luis Chiappe, curator and director of the Dinosaur Institute at the Natural History Museum in Los Angeles. He and his team are preparing a dinosaur exhibition that will not only showcase the facts that we know about dinosaurs, but will explain why we know them.

Watch more from the BBC and more videos about dinosaurs.

Meet Siats (pronounced SEE-otts) Meekerorum, the first giant mega-predator to be discovered in North America — specifically in the Utah desert — in over 60 years. In this Untamed Science video, we hear from Dr. Lindsay Zanno, Director of the Paleontology & Geology Research Laboratory at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, who explains how this 30 foot long, 4-ton, carnivorous creature flourished in the tens of millions of years before T-Rex ruled.

Untamed Science has visited Dr. Zanno before: Paleontology 101, a must-watch for anyone who loves dinosaurs.

via Scientific American.