spinning

Showing 29 posts tagged spinning

Watch as pen spinners Ian Jenson and 吳宗諺 (PPM) perform some epic pen spinning, complete with a few great slow motion moments that really showcase what’s going on. This short from Taiwan’s Kuma Films makes us want to get some weighted spinning pens, but anyone can start practicing with an everyday pencil, too: How to Spin a Pencil Around Your Thumb.

Update via LaughingSquid: “PPM is currently competing in the video-based Pen Spinning World Cup 2014, in which he is a semi-finalist.”

In the archives: spinningtricks, and practice.

An abandoned Victorian Sail factory becomes the stage for London’s Circulus, a circus company that mixes traditional and modern performing arts in found and forgotten spaces around the UK.

With tricking, hand-to-hand, free running, dancing, juggling, tumbling, aerial hoop, cyr wheel, banquine, breakdancing, hand balancing, trampoline and more we transformed this desolate yet decadent space into a thriving hub of movement and creativity.

Also: fireworks!

Previously: Angelica Bongiovonni rides a Cyr wheel, juggler Yanazo wins the JJF2012 first prizeSelyna Bogino juggles basketballs with her feet while upside down (yes, it’s true), and 13 dogs skip rope (yes, seriously). 

via The Awesomer.

Discovered by German physicist Helen Sperl in 1891, popularized in 1950 by Danish engineer Werner Ostberg, and demonstrated here by Grand Illusions' Hendrik Ball, this is a Tippe TopWatch as it spins “at a high angular velocity,” turning itself upside down to spin on its stem. But wait, there’s more

The interesting thing is that when the Tippe Top inverts, it also changes the direction of the rotation! In other words, at some point during the inversion, the top stops spinning around the axis through the stem and then starts to rotate the other way. At the same time, the center of mass is lifted, and the top is thus a quite interesting problem concerning conservation of energy and angular momentum.

There’s more physics and toy videos in the archives, including another from Grand Illusions: the Spiraculum.

Generate your own electricity with some wire, a magnetic field, and the relative movement between the two of them: Alom Shaha explains electromagnetic induction using this hand-powered – or perhaps more accurately, bacon-sandwich-powered – generator.

Related watching: magnetic fields, probably one of the more awe-inducing subjects on this blog.

via Science Demo.