swarms

Showing 12 posts tagged swarms

Above, filmmaker Cy Kuckenbaker's Midday Traffic Time Collapsed and Reorganized by Color: San Diego Study #3. But wait… here’s the real video of this freeway. So what’s going on here, and how did he do it? Via The Creator’s Project

Using a system called chroma key (that acts in several ways like a green screen) Kuckenbaker was able to remove, re-insert, and layer both backgrounds and objects—giving the appearance of remarkable mass action happening in a short time frame. Through this method, he was able to isolate car patterns and condense their cycles—turning what would otherwise be dry transportation data into a moving, visual representation of life in San Diego.

You may have also seen Kuckenbaker’s viral airplanes, Landings at San Diego Int Airport Nov 23, 2012, below: 

In the archive: more vehicles and more swarms.

In this absolutely incredible footage from EarthTouchTV, watch hundreds of thousands of sardines off the coast of South Africa swarm at the center of an animal feeding frenzy. With Earth-Touch divers right in the middle of the action, large, hungry predators — sharks, dolphins, diving gannets, and a 20 to 30 ton Bryde’s whale — all take part in this intense and fascinating sardine run.

There are hours of nature and underwater videos in the archives.

Amazing Cicada Life Cycle, presented (and bewitched) by the amazing Sir David Attenborough in this clip from the BBC’s Life in the Undergrowth.

Magicicada Brood II will make its 17-year appearance when the ground 8” down is a steady 64°F,” reports Radiolab in this excellent Cicada Tracker DIY project pageAnd why 17 years underground? From Scientific American

The curious phenomenon of the cicada’s periodical life cycle is the subject of much debate among scientists, who are limited to no small extent by the infrequency of the insect’s visits to the surface. Most agree, however, that climate shifts — notably the rapid warming following the end of the last ice age — have played a role.

There are seven species of periodical cicadas in North America, four bound to a 13-year cycle, three in a 17-year cycle. All are characterized by black and orange bodies, and males woo their mates with species-specific choruses that can be deafening in large numbers.

The genetic similarity of these seven species suggests a common ancestor in the last 8,000 years. And because emergence seems closely linked to soil temperature and moisture, it is likely that climate has played a role in both regulating their life cycles and cueing their appearance.

Cicadas don’t sting or bite. After a few weeks making noise up in the trees (measured at 94 decibles), eggs will be laid and will hatch. After feeding on sap, these hatchlings will drop down to burrow and live underground, next seen in the year 2030.