teacher

Showing 4 posts tagged teacher

Physics Teacher SOS workshop leader Dan Burns demonstrates how he uses stretched spandex lycra, weights, marbles, and gravity in his high school classes to make this impressive space-time warping demo. Filmed from afar, this general relativity explainer was made for other educators, but my kids were riveted by these tangible representations that include how our planets orbit the sun, how the moon orbits the Earth, and the free return trajectory used in the Apollo Program.

Update: See how to set up this excellent demonstration in this Fabric of the Cosmos how-to video.

File under: physics and education.

Thanks, @heathenreason.

Start with large basic shapes, add details after, have fun with the process, and then let go of it and try againIn Pardon My Dust, by director Adriel de la Torre, watch Dynamic Sketching teacher Peter Han illustrate on a chalkboard as he talks about teaching the practice of seeing, visualizing, and expressing drawn images through very simple shapes.

Related watching: chalk street artist Philippe Baudelocque, picture book maker Oliver Jeffers, and more videos that include drawing.

Because 2,000 ping pong balls and 30 middle-school teachers floating in “zero gravity” isn’t something you see everyday, the kids should watch (or rewatch!) this 2010 ScienceBob video. From northropgrumman.com

Zero gravity flights are performed using a specially modified aircraft, an FAA approved aircraft called G-Force One. The maneuvers are conducted in dedicated airspace 100 miles long by 10 miles wide. Specially trained pilots fly the aircraft in a series of maneuvers called parabolas, or arcs, between the altitudes of 24,000 and 32,000 feet.

At the beginning of each parabola, the aircraft climbs at a 45-degree angle. At the “top” of the parabola, the aircraft is “pushed over” into a controlled descent that creates a temporary zero-gravity environment. The teacher flights include approximately 15 parabolas ranging from low-gravity environments typical of the moon (1/6th G) or Mars (1/3 G) to complete weightlessness. At the end of each “weightless” period, which lasts approximately 30 seconds, the aircraft is gradually pulled out of the descent, reestablishing a more normal gravity environment inside the plane.

Related videos: exploding ping pong balls and more gravity (or lack of it).

Thanks, @xraydj.

Dr. Roy Lowry of Plymouth University in the UK made science explosively exciting for his class by demonstrating how powerful (and loud) it can be when the pressure of cold, trapped Liquid Nitrogen, a liquified gas, is warmed in a bucket of water. Then he added 1500 Ping Pong Balls.

If that didn’t make sense, watch. He’ll explain it all. And then when you see him pour the balls in and run away (it’s dangerous!), cover your ears or turn down the volume, and let the science commence!

(Updated video link.)

Thanks, @bneller and @mamagotcha.