technology

Showing 191 posts tagged technology

Festo HQ, the engineering team that brought us Aqua Penguins, Aqua Jellyfishdragonfly-inspired BionicOpters, and a robot that flies like a bird can now add Bionic Kangaroo to their list of animal-inspired achievements in technology. From spectrum.ieee.org

BionicKangaroo is able to realistically emulate the jumping behavior of real kangaroos, which means that it can efficiently recover energy from one jump to help it make another jump. Without this capability, kangaroos (real ones) would get very very tired very very quickly, but by using their tendons like elastic springs, the animals can bound at high speeds efficiently for substantial periods of time.

BionicKangaroo emulates this with an actual elastic spring, which partially “charges” the legs on landing.

Bonus fun: wear the corresponding armband and you can control the kangaroo using gestures. Mmmmmmm, biomechanics.

via Gizmodo.

Shape, a film about design and how it can change our experiences in the spaces that we live. “If for one day you had the power to make your world work better, what would you change?” Presented by Pivot Dublin and Dublin City Council, directed & designed by Johnny Kelly, and written by Scott Burnett. Explore more at MakeShapeChange.com, think design.

Related watching: design.

via Vimeo.

If you’re a two year old, injured snowy owl in need of some new feathers, you’ll be lucky to find yourself at a raptor center like the Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota. There, someone like Avian physiologist Lori Arent can perform the modern version of an old falconers’ procedure called imping – when a bird’s damaged flight feathers are replaced with a stronger ones. From National Geographic:

“I have a whole freezer full of harvested feathers, of different types and sizes, and I wanted to choose the right ones for this animal. I picked feathers from a male the same age as this bird and they fit perfectly…” 

She then whittled small sticks of bamboo so that one end poked into the shaft of the new feather and the other into the shaft still attached to the bird (where the burned feathers had been carefully sheared off).

With a little drop of quick-drying epoxy, she cemented each new feather into place. “If attached right, the new feathers are just as effective as the old ones” in letting a bird do all of its aerial maneuvers, she said….

Eventually, the owl will lose the borrowed feathers—in a process called molting—and grow its own new ones.

Snowy owls are amazing animals that travel long distances every year. Watch Snowy Owl Invasion.

And another lucky bird: Rocky the Bald Eagle is released from the Eagle Valley Raptor Center.

If you’ve seen how underwater time-lapse can show the secret life of a coral reef on this site, then you already know that brilliantly fluorescing corals and sponges have fascinating, unseen experiences. But you’ve never seen “slow” marine animals like this: Slow Life by University of Queensland PhD student Daniel Stoupin.

To make this little clip I took 150000 shots. Why so many? Because macro photography involves shallow depth of field. To extend it, I used focus stacking. Each frame of the video is actually a stack that consists of 3-12 shots where in-focus areas are merged. Just the intro and last scene are regular real-time footage. One frame required about 10 minutes of processing time (raw conversion + stacking). Unfortunately, the success rate was very low due to copious technical challenges and I spent almost 9 long months just to learn how to make these kinds of videos and understand how to work with these delicate creatures.

Make sure that you watch this full-screen, HD actual size. The detail is incredible.

In the archives: more coral and time lapse.

via Kottke. Thanks, @cmykadam.

Using nothing but LEGO components, the team at Brickride builds supercool rollercoasters. The one above: Incredible 100% LEGO Roller Coaster with Corkscrew. Watch a time-lapse of how they put it together.

In the archives, more LEGO and other awesome toy builds: LEGO Great Ball Contraption, DIY paper rollercoasters, amazing marble machinesK’nex Clockwork, and what you can do with a lot of toothpicks.

via The Awesomer.