teeth

Showing 5 posts tagged teeth

In the mountains of Ethiopia, the BBC’s Steve Backshall and his Deadly 60 team track a group of graminivorous (grass-eating) gelada baboons to observe their amazing, lion-sized, canine teeth, which are central to the primates’ social communications. From Mary Bates at Wired’s Zoologic blog

The gum-bearing yawn was most common with males, especially high-ranking ones. This kind of yawn exposed the gelada’s impressive canine teeth, which stood out against the reddish-pink color of their gums and the inside of their mouths. It was often accompanied by a loud call, and the researchers believe the yawn functions as a long-distance display. Males used this yawn during periods of tension, such as the time right before feeding, suggesting it may serve to intimidate other geladas.

The other two less intense types of yawns were seen most in females during friendly interactions. The researchers found these yawns to be more contagious, and observed females mirroring the intensity of other females’ yawns. They believe these yawns are part of a complex communication system between geladas that often engage in friendly interactions. The contagiousness of the yawns in these contexts suggests the behavior might play a role in synchronizing the activity between two geladas, strengthening the emotional connection between them,  or signaling the quality of their relationship.

Gelada males and females might use yawns differently, but all three types of yawn contribute to the smooth workings of gelada society; they function to let everyone know who’s in charge and which geladas are friends.

In the archives: more BBC, more primatesmore yawns, and some teeth.

Easy experiment: Drink orange juice. Brush your teeth. Drink orange juice again. What just happened?

From Bytesize Science, an explanation as to why most toothpastes change the taste of orange juice. The video includes an intro on the five basic tastes that we’re able to detect: sweetness, sourness, saltiness, bitterness, and umami — a Japanese word that we’ve borrowed to describe a “pleasant savory taste” or “a pleasant, brothy or meaty flavor" — and the ingredients of toothpaste.

More videos about the body and how things work.

From the BBC series Life, meet the Sarcastic Fringehead as Sir David Attenborough narrates. 

More from Discovery.com

This small, scrappy fish found along the Pacific Coast from San Francisco to Baja California, Mexico, maintains a relatively small zone of personal space around its home, usually a shell, a can or a bottle. When an intruder invades that space, the fringehead attacks fearlessly and aggressively, baring its teeth and snapping its jaws… 

Why invest so much time and energy into keeping away unwanted solicitations? Because in the fringehead’s preferred habitat — on sandy or muddy ocean bottoms just beyond the breaker zone — competition for resources is fierce. To ensure they get their fair share of food and space, fringeheads stake out a territory that they can realistically defend… Some scientists estimate they consume almost 14 times their body weight per year.

Updated video. The original can be found here.

via Neatorama.

'Tis the season for scary creatures with toothy grins. From the team at MBARIdeep-sea fish with some serious teeth!

Listed in the order they appear: Aristostomias scintillans (Shiny loosejaw), Anoplogaster cornuta (Fangtooth), Tactostoma macropus (Longfin dragonfish), Chaenophryne, Chauliodus macouni (Viperfish), Tactostoma macropus (Longfin dragonfish), Chauliodus macouni (Viperfish), Tactostoma macropus (Longfin dragonfish).

via It’s Okay to Be Smart.

From the Vancouver Aquarium

Sea otters usually prey on hard-shelled food — clams, abalones, mussels, crabs… If they’re too hard to crack with their teeth, they’ll smash them open with, or against, a rock. 

This is what this sea otter (Elfin) is doing when he bashes the ice against the rock. He’s after the hidden gems of food frozen within the ice.

The Aquarium’s marine mammal trainers freeze seafood in chunks of ice and give them to the sea otters to play with, so they have a variety of ways to get their food — and it’s just plain fun.

Previously from the Vancouver Aquarium, Baby Octopuses! And of course, YouTube stars Milo and (Exxon Valdez Oil spill survivor) Nyac from Otters Holding Hands!