the netherlands

Showing 13 posts tagged the netherlands

How can the physics and engineering of wind and water change a country? From the world of European travel guides, here’s a quick primer: The Netherlands: Working Windmills.

300 years ago, half of what we know as The Netherlands was under water. Slowly, the former seabed was reclaimed and the Dutch went to work drying the ground with the country’s leading natural resource - the wind. Over 1000 windmills, some still functioning, survive in the Netherlands today, reminding locals and tourists alike of the clever engine that powered the creation of this land. 

Related reading: Archimedes’ screw. Related watching: how wind turbines workwingtip vortices, Windswept, The Old Mill, and more amazing videos about The Netherlands.

Watch the making of Florentijn Hofman’s Feestaardvarken (Partyaardvark), a 30 meter long, climbable concrete sculpture made for Burgers’ Zoo in Arnhem, The Netherlands.

Hofman’s work with giant animals might be familiar: here’s his giant rubber duck in Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour. Also in the archives: a video of an adorable aardvark baby and more excellent projects happening in The Netherlands.

via Designboom.

Solar Bell, a kite-like wind sculpture made of lighter-than-air materials — carbon fiber tubing and paper-thin solar panels — by Argentinian artist Tomàs Saraceno, in association with the Aerospace Engineering Faculty at TU Delft, The Netherlands.

The design of Solar Bell is based on a model of a modular tetrahedron, or four-sided pyramid, invented by Alexander Graham Bell during his early investigations into manned flight. Bell made important discoveries in the field of aviation and frame construction, and happened upon the strongest geometrical structure in the known cosmos—the octet truss—the same space frame that Buckminster Fuller later followed in his Geodesic dome. Saraceno breathes new life into Bell’s legacy by using the materials and knowledge of our time.

via DesignBoom.

In August, 2009, Stefan Schöppers and his team succeeded in breaking the world record for the largest domino toppled in a chain that begins with a “regular”-size domino. Their largest domino, shown in the video above, is 6.40 m (20 ft 11 in) in height.

That record held until an 8m (26 ft 3 in) tall domino was toppled in a on the Dutch National Science Quiz TV show in January, 2013. You can watch that video here.

So how does this all work? Learn more about the science behind the spectacle in this domino chain reaction video by Professor Stephen Morris, and enjoy more videos with dominoes.