time

Showing 33 posts tagged time

In a mix of artistry, geometry, and technology, San Francisco-based Earthscape artist Andres Amador creates massive sketches in the beach sand – sometimes geometric, and sometimes more abstract and serendipitous – using rakes and ropes. The designs are temporary; where the waves don’t wash away his work, walking beach visitors and the wind will naturally muddy and dissolve the precise lines.

Amador has become keenly aware of how impermanent his work is, and has embraced nature’s tidal rhythm, starting one hour before low tide and continuing to work until an hour afterward. In this KQED Arts video, he explains: 

People are really… they’re enthralled that i would do something that is destined to wash away. That really strikes a chord with people because really, truly, it’s the story of our lives. Our lives are impermanent, and the tide is unstoppable.

And though this art form is tied directly to nature, Amador makes great use of modern technology. The designs can be both checked and appreciated-in-full from high above the beach using a remote controlled helicopter.

To see more from high above, visit AndresAmadorArts.com or view more photos here.

In the archives, two other incredible beach art videos: One Plastic Beach and Theo Jansen’s wind-fueled Strandbeests.

From KQED.

How Do We Know How Old the Sun Is? The Royal Observatory, Greenwich, and animation studio Beakus join together to explain how Kepler and Newton’s laws help us figure out the weight of the sun, how the age of our solar system can be calculated by studying meteorites, and how that data helps us determine the sun’s age.

Previously from the Royal Observatory Greenwich, Measuring the Universe, and more videos about the sun.

When this flight paths of starlings video by artist and professor Dennis Hlynsky went viral, it sparked a lot of questions for us: How did he make the visualizations? How do the starlings move quickly as a flock? What makes other groups of animals move the way they do?

In Micromigrations from The Atlantic, Hlynsky discusses his own questions as we observe the water striders, ants, starlings, vultures, crows, and little white flying bugs that continue to inspire his curiosity and his work.

Watch starlings videos and explore more about the way animals (and robots) move, including water striders, cheetahs, catssnakes, and hummingbirds.

Thanks, Sam.

This papercraft pop-up book illustrates how South America and Africa used to be connected, how the supercontinent Pangaea broke apart 200 million years ago, how the Earth's seven primary tectonic plates are ever-shifting, and much more in this TED-Ed by educator Michael Molina: The Pangaea Pop-up.

There’s more paper-inspired science storytelling in the archives, including The Animated Life of A.R. Wallace, stop-motion shorts by Studio Nos, Whale Fall (After Life of a Whale), and another pop-up book: Revolution ( Life Cycle of a Drop of Water).